Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Incapable of being navigated; innavigable.
  • Not to be crossed or passed over; impassable.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And suppose some crane-necked general to go speeding by on a tall charger, spurring the destiny of nations, red-hot in expedition, there would indubitably be some effusion of military blood, and oaths, and a certain crash of glass; and while the chieftain rode forward with a purple coxcomb, the street would be left to original darkness, unpiloted, unvoyageable, a province of the desert night.

    Virginibus Puerisque and other papers

  • Personality, "which offers a rich mine of suggestion," it would seem that the shells to be picked up on the shore of the ocean of truth will ever become scantier, and the agnostics of the future will gaze forth ever more hopelessly on that gloomy and unvoyageable sea.

    The Life Radiant

  • Do thou only, asking divine favour with peace-offerings, be bounteous in welcome and draw out reasons for delay, while the storm rages at sea and Orion is wet, and his ships are shattered and the sky unvoyageable. '

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • In itself, it is a great and travailing ocean, unsounded, unvoyageable, an eternal mystery to man; or, let us say, it is a monstrous and impassable mountain, one side of which, and a few near slopes and foothills, we can dimly study with these mortal eyes.

    Lay Morals

  • If, two thousand years ago, we had been permitted to watch the slow settling of the slime of those turbid rivers into the polluted sea, and the gaining upon its deep and fresh waters of the lifeless, impassable, unvoyageable plain, how little could we have understood the purpose with which those islands were shaped out of the void, and the torpid waters enclosed with their desolate walls of sand!

    Stones of Venice [introductions]

  • We Protestants know better: we understand the impossibility of supposing such a narrow and local reference in orbs, so transcendently vast as those composing the constellation -- orbs removed from each other by such unvoyageable worlds of space, and having, in fact, no real reference to each other more than to any other heavenly bodies whatsoever.

    Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers

  • Mor this unvoyageable gulf obfcure detain from following thy illuftrious track, rhou haft achievM our liberty, confinM iVithin Hell gates till now, thou us impower'd To fortify thus far, and overlay 370 iVith this portentous bridjge the dark abyfs.

    The Works of the English Poets.: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical

  • De Quincey enumerates some of them -- "Heaven opening to eject her rebellious children; the unvoyageable depths of ancient Chaos, with its 'anarch old' and its eternal war of wrecks; these traversed by that great leading Angel that drew after him the third part of the heavenly host; earliest Paradise dawning upon the warrior-angel out of this far-distant 'sea without shore' of chaos; the dreadful phantoms of Sin and Death, prompted by secret sympathy and snuffing the distant scent of 'mortal change on earth,' chasing the steps of their great progenitor and sultan; finally the heart-freezing visions, shown and narrated to Adam, of human misery through vast successions of shadowy generations: all these scenical opportunities offered in the _Paradise Lost_ become in the hands of the mighty artist elements of undying grandeur not matched on earth."

    Milton

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