Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • A train going in the direction of the metropolis or the main terminus.
  • A train going in the direction conventionally called up.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • With this she started, and reached Warborne in time for the up-train.

    Two on a Tower

  • The last stopping up-train was about ten, so that half-an-hour could well be afforded for looking round.

    The Hand of Ethelberta

  • “Waiting for the up-train from Barchester, sir,” said the guard.

    The Small House at Allington

  • I was sent here by the up-train; the line was just cleared in time for it.

    No Name

  • Another up-train passed them, though with less vehemence than the first one.

    4.50 From Paddington

  • Doing nothing, and thinking of nothing specially, for the three-forty up-train had gone through the station, and it was a good hour yet before the five-ten down express was due, he had been lazily leaning in a half - dreamy and almost dozing state against the side of the booking-office.

    Teddy The Story of a Little Pickle

  • "I found I could get away sooner than I expected, so I caught the last up-train -- and here I am."

    The Splendid Folly

  • Patricia was tremendously interested and it was with the greatest regret that she heard the whistle of the up-train, while the tangle of the sycamore was still undisturbed in the roadway.

    Miss Pat at School

  • It is true my up-train did not stop at Garrison's or Cold Spring, but the conductor, upon a hint as to the necessity of the case, kindly slackened the speed of the express so that I could jump off from the rear platform.

    Forty-Six Years in the Army

  • There -- you needn't drive so fast; the up-train don't go by till the half-hour, and every minute is precious, at least to _me_.

    Kate Coventry An Autobiography

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