Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Past participle of upgrow

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Before the planting of rice, you have to clear the upgrown grass.

    6.1 General recommendations

  • Amongst them were several of Brown's upgrown sons, followed by their father, ready to settle in this new State, where they might turn the tide of public opinion in favour of Freedom.

    Old John Brown, the man whose soul is marching on

  • But children heed no minor distinctions; to them, the inhabited world is composed of the two main divisions: children and upgrown people; the latter being in no way superior to the former -- only hopelessly different.

    The Golden Age

  • Whenever Tess lifted her head she beheld always the great upgrown straw-stack, with the men in shirt-sleeves upon it, against the gray north sky; in front of it the long red elevator like a Jacob's ladder, on which a perpetual stream of threshed straw ascended, a yellow river running up-hill, and spouting out on the top of the rick.

    Tess of the d'Urbervilles

  • Whenever Tess lifted her head she beheld always the great upgrown straw-stack, with the men in shirt-sleeves upon it, against the gray north sky; in front of it the long red elevator like a Jacob's ladder, on which a perpetual stream of threshed straw ascended, a yellow river running uphill, and spouting out on the top of the rick.

    Tess of the d'Urbervilles

  • The hedgerows were upgrown, and the ditches stopped.

    A Fool's Errand. By One of the Fools

  • He came to the edge of a plantation -- one of those forlorn, deserted homesteads of the last years of the war, upgrown with brambles, ugly with broken fences and desolate with vacant buildings having blank apertures in place of doors and windows.

    The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce — Volume 2: In the Midst of Life: Tales of Soldiers and Civilians

  • A moment later he had emerged from the forest into a small, open space, mostly upgrown to brambles.

    The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce — Volume 2: In the Midst of Life: Tales of Soldiers and Civilians

  • And she would have told them how in those times man did not earn his living by toil unending, by ceaseless pain and sorrow, but that nature helped him as he helped her, and the earth brought out her stores of rich fruits for the welfare of her upgrown sons, well knowing that they in turn with loving service would seek to make nobler and better that which nature gave to them in charge, birds and beasts, flowers and trees, plants and stones and all that lives — which is everything.

    The Strange Little Girl A Story for Children

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