Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Elevated; of land, upland.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Last year I found the nest of one in an uplying beech-wood, in a low bush near the roadside, where cows passed and browsed daily.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 104, June, 1866

  • When I came out on an uplying heath, the mists were just beginning to roll away from the valley below.

    Hillsboro People

  • Lena's heavy face drew into anxious, grotesque wrinkles at this kind of talk, and he visited the uplying pasture more and more frequently.

    Hillsboro People

  • Our course at first lies along the highway under great chestnut-trees whose nuts are just dropping, then through an orchard and across a little creek, thence gently rising through a long series of cultivated fields toward some high uplying land behind which rises a rugged wooded ridge or mountain, the most sightly point in all this section.

    An Idyl of the Honey-bee

  • When I came out on an uplying heath, the mists were just beginning to roll away from the valley below.

    The Artist

  • Last year I found the nest of one in an uplying beech wood, in a low bush near the roadside, where cows passed and browsed daily.

    In the Catskills Selections from the Writings of John Burroughs

  • Our course at first lies along the highway, under great chestnut-trees whose nuts are just dropping, then through an orchard and across a little creek, thence gently rising through a long series of cultivated fields toward some high, uplying land, behind which rises a rugged wooded ridge or mountain, the most sightly point in all this section.

    Birds and Bees, Sharp Eyes and Other Papers

  • In a meadow on the hills that encompass the city, I found the American dandelion in bloom, and some large red clover, and started up some skylarks as I might start up the field sparrows in our own uplying fields.

    Winter Sunshine

  • Our course at first lies along the highway under great chestnut-trees whose nuts are just dropping, then through an orchard and across a little creek, thence gently rising through a long series of cultivated fields toward some high uplying land behind which rises a rugged wooded ridge or mountain, the most sightly point in all this section.

    The Writings of John Burroughs — Volume 05: Pepacton

  • In some sections of the country, when there is no spring near the house, the farmer, with much labor and pains, brings one from some uplying field or wood.

    The Writings of John Burroughs — Volume 05: Pepacton

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