Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To roll up.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To roll up.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To roll up.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From up- +‎ roll. Compare Dutch oprollen ("to roll up"), German aufrollen ("to roll up").

Examples

  • The British were considered more bloody-minded, firing on the downroll into the enemy ship while the French supposedly fired on the uproll, into the rigging to dismande but not kill the enemy.

    John Paul Jones

  • The whole ship shook as the guns fired on the uproll; thick white smoke, briefly shot through with sparks, was everywhere.

    INTELLIVORE

  • Bag of reeds here, sir, lanyard there, sir, and it's best to fire on the uproll if you don't want to make us look like lubberly fools.

    Sharpe's Trafalgar

  • With the uproll and the downcarol of day and night delivering

    St. Winefred's Well

  • "Yes," said Dan simply, leaning forward to take advantage of the uproll of the tug to locate the yacht more exactly.

    Dan Merrithew

  • "Bar shot, chain shot and round shot, fired on the uproll and intended to take out our sticks.

    Sharpe's Trafalgar

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