Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of urate.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Abnormalities may include: decrease in number or volume, coloring of urate portion changing to yellow or green, increase in water content of fecal portion (diarrhea), increase in urine portion (polyuria), decrease in the feces volume with increased urates (polyurates), and the presence of blood.

    The Last Chance Dog

  • In some concentrated urines a belt of urates will appear at the line of demarkation; but these dissolve on warming.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 611, September 17, 1887

  • The following selection will be found sufficient for his purpose: A set of the chief varieties of uric acid, calcic oxalate, and triple phosphate; the urates and oxalurates; urea nitrate, calcic hippurate and carbonate, hippuric acid, cystin, well mounted "casts" of the _tubili uriniferi_, spermatozoa, etc.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 611, September 17, 1887

  • If an abundant amorphous deposit of a fawn or pink -- from _uroerythrin_ -- color slowly settles and is readily diffused, _urates_ in excess can be anticipated.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 611, September 17, 1887

  • It is a remarkable fact that the waste nitrogen should be excreted in the form of uric acid or urates from such widely differing classes of animals as birds and serpents.

    The Chemistry of Food and Nutrition

  • In the urine it is in combination with alkalies as urates, perhaps also with some organic body.

    The Chemistry of Food and Nutrition

  • Uric acid is a transparent colourless crystalline body almost insoluble in water but soluble as urates in the presence of alkalies.

    The Chemistry of Food and Nutrition

  • In the urine of children, it is not unusual to find a copious precipitate of urates, yet without any observed effect on them.

    The Chemistry of Food and Nutrition

  • The symptoms of gout point to the presence of a toxin in the blood, and it is this which produces the lesions; the deposition of urates in the joints being secondary.

    The Chemistry of Food and Nutrition

  • Those particularly interested in the subject of the purins and gout are referred to the lecture on "The meaning of uric acid and the urates," by

    The Chemistry of Food and Nutrition

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