Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of verbosity.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But the new thing did not fit into the little outlines and verbosities which served as a philosophy for our political hacks.

    A Preface to Politics

  • I handed it over, yet it was a grin that contained more sincere thanks than a multitude of the verbosities of speech common to the members of my own class.

    Chapter 13

  • He grinned when I handed it over, yet it was a grin that contained more sincere thanks than a multitude of the verbosities of speech common to the members of my own class.

    The Sea Wolf

  • -- You rhetorician there, with your verbosities and your barbarisms, your antitheses and balances and periods, off with the whole pack of them.

    Works of Lucian of Samosata — Volume 01

  • We are stuffed with abstract conceptions, and glib with verbalities and verbosities; and in the culture of these higher functions the peculiar sources of joy connected with our simpler functions often dry up, and we grow stone-blind and insensible to life's more elementary and general goods and joys.

    Talks To Teachers On Psychology; And To Students On Some Of Life's Ideals

  • We might end up needing to have a couple of pieces to each class paragraph, pieces that perhaps build upon each other to produce the different outputs with different verbosities.

    Planet Ubuntu

  • All languages have their quirks and verbosities, which to the outsider look stupid and annoying.

    Hottest News Articles

  • a grin that contained more sincere thanks than a multitude of the verbosities of speech common to the members of my own class.

    Chapter 13

  • Lastly, I confess that I have as vast contemplative ends as I have moderate civil ends; for I have taken all knowledge to be my province; and if I could purge it of two sorts of rovers, whereof the one with frivolous disputations, confutations and verbosities, the other with blind experiments and auricular traditions and impostures, hath committed so many spoils, I hope I should bring in industrious observations, grounded conclusions and profitable inventions and discoveries -- the best state of that province.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 1 "Austria, Lower" to "Bacon"

  • Lastly, I confess that I have as vast contemplative ends as I have moderate civil ends: for I have taken all knowledge to be my province; and if I could purge it of two sorts of rovers, whereof the one with frivolous disputations, confutations, and verbosities, the other with blind experiments and auricular traditions and impostures, hath committed so many spoils, I hope I should bring in industrious observations, grounded conclusions, and profitable inventions and discoveries; the best state of that province.

    Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern — Volume 3

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