Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adv. In a veridical way.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Truthfully; veraeiously; really.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Whether or not that is assigning "blame," as Greg denies it was intended to do, it certainly assigns causation, in a way that I find just empirically, veridically incorrect.

    Hillary Hits Critics For Taking Her RFK Assassination Remarks "Out Of Context"

  • On this formulation, the disjunctivist is committed to denying that whatever fundamental kind of mental event occurs when one is veridically perceiving the world, that kind of event can occur whether or not one is veridically perceiving.

    Petty Injuries

  • However, what they deny is that such a kind K is the fundamental kind of mental event occurring when a subject veridically perceives the world.

    Petty Injuries

  • So this version of the causal argument can accommodate the disjunctivist's claim that there are significant non-causal conditions necessary for the occurrence of the kind of experience that occurs when one veridically perceives the world.

    Petty Injuries

  • They suggest that one may hold a naïve realist view according to which mind-independent objects, such as tables and trees, are constituents of the experience one has when one veridically perceives the world, without being committed to a further claim about what the essence of such episodes consists in.

    Petty Injuries

  • Rather, the epistemic difference is due to the fact that the kind of subjective experiential state one is in when one veridically perceives the world is not the same as the kind of subjective experiential state one is in when one has a subjectively indistinguishible hallucination.

    Petty Injuries

  • For example a subject might veridically perceive a table in front of him while hallucinating a pink rat on top of it.

    Petty Injuries

  • They might then hold that this layer of existential content, which is present in experience whether or not one is veridically perceiving the world, provides a common mental factor for veridical and hallucinatory experiences.

    Petty Injuries

  • Those who reject the metaphysical assumption that mental events (or states) have a ˜fundamental™ kind may instead formulate their disjunctivist stance in terms of the claim that the differences between the kind of mental event that occurs when one veridically perceives the world and the kind of mental event that occurs when one hallucinates are due to a differences in mental features of the events in question.

    Petty Injuries

  • The proponent of this modified causal argument claims that there are no non-causal conditions necessary for the occurrence of the kind of experience that occurs when one hallucinates that cannot also obtain when one veridically perceives the world.

    Petty Injuries

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