Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A bladder, especially the urinary bladder or the gallbladder.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A bladder, especially the urinary bladder or the gall bladder.
  • n. The vesica piscis or oval aureole in mediaeval painting

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A bladder.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In anatomy, a bladder; a cyst; a sac; especially, the urinary bladder, or urocyst, the permanently pervious part of the allantoic sac.
  • n. In botany, same as vesile.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a distensible membranous sac (usually containing liquid or gas)

Etymologies

Latin vēsīca.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin vēsīca ("bladder"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In Latin the mandorla is called the vesica piscis, or fish bladder, another oval shape.

    A Handbook of Symbols in Christian Art

  • Of course, this device is properly called the vesica everter.

    WordPress.com News

  • The statues are arranged in five horizontal lines from north to south, exclusive of the figure in the "vesica," the oval above.

    Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of Salisbury A Description of its Fabric and a Brief History of the See of Sarum

  • The footprint of the Cathedral is a vesica piscis (“fish bladder” in Latin), an oval with pointed ends created by the intersection of two circles of the same radius.

    A Hermeneutic of Rupture?

  • Its floor plan is contained within the proportions of a vesica.

    Prince Charles Reflects On 'Sacred Geometry'

  • As Professor Critchlow has shown, the infant Christ's throat, from which the entire Christian tradition was eventually spoken, falls at the very centre of the vesica and therefore at the very heart of the building.

    Prince Charles Reflects On 'Sacred Geometry'

  • As the illustration demonstrates, the centre point of the vesica sits at the very centre of the building so that the North and South doors, seen here on the left and right, are exactly positioned.

    Prince Charles Reflects On 'Sacred Geometry'

  • The great Belle Verrière window, for example, which depicts the Madonna and Child, sits perfectly within a vesica and thus perfectly within the floor plan of the cathedral, with every significant point in the design of the window corresponding to key positions in the geometry of the rest of the building.

    Prince Charles Reflects On 'Sacred Geometry'

  • The great Belle Verrière window, for example, which depicts the Madonna and Child, sits perfectly within a vesica and thus perfectly within the floor plan of the cathedral, with every significant point in the design of the window corresponding to key positions in the geometry of the rest of the building.

    Prince Charles Reflects On 'Sacred Geometry'

  • After progressing through the building, following the course of Chartres's famous labyrinth with its central chamber containing twelve petals on the floor exactly at the point, incidentally, where Christ's feet appear in the Belle Verrière window, the pilgrim would pass the Southern door, above which is the image of the fully grown Christ, enclosed within a vesica.

    Prince Charles Reflects On 'Sacred Geometry'

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