Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of vibex.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.pl. More or less extensive patches of subcutaneous extravasation of blood.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The petechiæ and vibices in the sea-scurvy and occasional hæmorrhages evince the defect of venous absorption; the occasional hæmoptoe at the commencement of pulmonary consumption, seems also to arise from defect of venous absorption; and the scrofula, which arises from the inactivity of the lymphatic absorbent system, frequently exists along with pulmonary as well as with mesenteric consumption.

    Note XI

  • They had both large vibices on their limbs, and petechiæ; in one the feet were in danger of mortification, in the other the legs were oedematous.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • This blood, from its dark colour, and from the many vibices and petechiæ, seems to have been venous blood; the quickness of the pulse, and the irregularity of the motion of the heart, are to be ascribed to debility of that part of the system; as the extravasation of blood originated from the defect of venous absorption.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • P----, who had drank intemperately, was seized with the epilepsy when he was in his fortieth year; in one of these fits the white part of his eyes was left totally black with effused blood; which was attended with no pain or heat, and was in a few weeks gradually absorbed, changing colour as is usual with vibices from bruises.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Hence the blood, which is extravasated in bruises or vibices, is gradually many days in disappearing; but after due evacuations the inflamed vessels on the white of the eye, if any stimulant lotion is applied, totally disappear in a few hours.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • In the sea-scurvy and petechial fever the veins do not perfectly perform this office of absorption; and hence the vibices are occasioned by blood stagnating at their extremities, or extravasated into the cellular membrane.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • _ In the sea-scurvy there exists an inactivity of venous absorption, whence vibices and petechiæ, and sometimes ulcers.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • As the column of blood pressing on the of origins of the veins of the lower extremities, when the body is erect, opposes the ascent of the blood in them, they are more frequently liable to become enlarged, and to produce varixes, or vibices, or, lastly, ulcers about the legs, than on the upper parts of the body.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Hence their use in sea-scurvy, the vibices of which are owing to a defect of venous absorption; and by external stimulants, as vinegar, and by electricity, and perhaps by oxygen.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • If the beginnings or absorbent mouths of the venous system remain torpid, petechiæ or vibices are produced in fevers, similar to those which are seen in scurvy without fever.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.