Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The residence of a vicar.
  • noun The benefice of a vicar.
  • noun The duties or office of a vicar; a vicariate.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The benefice of a vicar.
  • noun The house or residence of a vicar.
  • noun The office, position, duties, or functions of a vicar.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The benefice of a vicar.
  • noun The house or residence of a vicar.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun countable The residence of a vicar
  • noun The benefice, duties or office of a vicar

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an official residence provided by a church for its parson or vicar or rector

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • If she could afford to reside as a lodger in – vicarage, she would choose that house before all others as the place of her abode; but, not being so circumstanced, she would never come under its roof, except as an occasional visitor, unless sickness or calamity should render her assistance really needful, or until age or infirmity made her incapable of maintaining herself.

    Agnes Grey

  • The vicarage was a sprawling Victorian building, huge and cheerless enough for an army barracks, but the vicar, the Reverend James Bell, moonfaced and beaming, greeted them warmly.

    Frost at Christmas

  • The vicarage was a snug little cottage, with a rustic porch, adorned with the Virginian creeper, which, together with the massive ivy, also nearly covered the house.

    Gladys, the Reaper

  • It was that same "dinner" at the "vicarage" -- in Cherryvale one dines at mid-day, and the Presbyterian minister blindly believed he had invited the O'Neills for supper -- that gave Tess one of her most brilliant inspirations.

    Missy

  • Father Thomas, who had grown grey there; but he had no art in gathering money, which he asked for in a shamefaced way; and the vicarage was a poor one, hardly enough for the old man's needs.

    The Isles of Sunset

  • This was a sore trial to the old priest, Father Thomas, who had grown grey there; but he had no art in gathering money, which he asked for in a shamefaced way; and the vicarage was a poor one, hardly enough for the old man's needs.

    Paul the Minstrel and Other Stories Reprinted from The Hill of Trouble and The Isles of Sunset

  • The church was one of the fine edifices for which the fen country is so famous, and the vicarage was a comfortable house, with large and very beautiful gardens and paddock, and with outlying fields.

    Autobiographical Sketches

  • The church was one of the fine edifices for which the fen country is so famous, and the vicarage was a comfortable house, with large and very beautiful gardens and paddock, and with outlying fields.

    Autobiographical Sketches

  • Close to the wall which divides the churchyard from the vicarage is a plain stone set by Charlotte Brontë to mark the grave of Tabby, the faithful servant who served the Brontës from their childhood till all but Charlotte were dead.

    Seeing Europe with Famous Authors, Volume 2 Great Britain and Ireland, Part 2

  • Another event in the life of the vicarage was the periodical lameness of the vicar's strawberry mare, followed by the invariable discovery that

    A Tale of a Lonely Parish

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