Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One of a class of temporal officers who originally represented the bishops, but later erected their offices into fiefs, and became feudal nobles.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One of a class of temporal officers who originally represented the bishops, but later erected their offices into fiefs, and became feudal nobles.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In French feudal jurisprudence, the lieutenant or deputy of a bishop in temporal matters; also, a minor title of French feudal nobility.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French, from Latin vice-dominus, from Latin vice "instead of" + dominus "master, lord".

Examples

  • There is thus no comparison between the title of vidame, which only marks a vassal, and the titles which by fief emanate from the

    Court Memoirs of France Series — Complete

  • Nérac, a vidame of Gascony, _nom de Dieu! et il aura affaire à moi, ce pantin-là!

    The Belovéd Vagabond

  • As a former intimate friend of the Marquis d'Esgrignon, the vidame introduced the Vicomte d'Esgrignon -- Victurnien

    Repertory of the Comedie Humaine Part 2

  • The vidame went immediately, at Auguste's request, to the chief of the private police of Paris, and without bringing Madame Jules 'name or person into the narrative, although they were really the gist of it, he made the official aware of the fears of the family of Maulincour about this mysterious person who was bold enough to swear the death of an officer of the Guards, in defiance of the law and the police.

    Ferragus

  • The worthy vidame did not share his young friend's confidence when Auguste declared that in the time in which they now lived, the police and the government were able to lay bare all mysteries, and that if it were absolutely necessary to have recourse to those powers, he should find them most powerful auxiliaries.

    Ferragus

  • Monsieur de Maulincour, the dowager, and the vidame breathed again with joy unspeakable.

    Ferragus

  • At last, anxious to reconnoitre the position of the enemy, he thought he might without danger initiate the vidame into the secrets of his situation.

    Ferragus

  • Maulincour, perfectly restored to health, was breakfasting with his grandmother and the vidame, Justin entered to make his report.

    Ferragus

  • Monsieur le vidame knows about these things too well to want me to tell him if it is the husband who takes the wife, or the wife who takes the husband; but

    Ferragus

  • At that instant Auguste remembered the instructions of the vidame.

    Ferragus

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