Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. See; consult; refer to! A remark directing the readers to look to the specified place for epexegesis.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin vidēte ("see!"), second-person plural present active imperative form of videō ("I see").

Examples

  • Hoc autem tantum miraculum videns Melich.i. potestas ciuitatis, vocauit ad se fratrem Iacobum, et fecit eum ponere indumenta, sua, et dixit, videte fratres, Ite cum gratia

    The Journal of Friar Odoric

  • Dixerunt enim nobis, videte, quòd omnia benè intelligatis, quia non expediret, quòd non omnia bene intelligeretis.

    The long and wonderful voyage of Frier Iohn de Plano Carpini

  • For as he devoureth his children, so one of them seeketh to devour and suppress the other; while antiquity envieth there should be new additions, and novelty cannot be content to add but it must deface; surely the advice of the prophet is the true direction in this matter, State super vias antiquas, et videte quaenam sit via recta et bona et ambulate in ea.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • Dixerunt enim nobis, videte, qu騞 omnia ben� intelligatis, quia non expediret, qu騞 non omnia bene intelligeretis.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • * Denique quomodo respondeat advertite, et videte latebras ambiguitatis falsitati praeparare refugia, ita ut etiam nos cum primum ea legimus, recta vel correcta propemodum gauderemus.

    Pneumatologia

  • [78] "Denique quomodo respondeat advertite, et videte latebras ambiguitatis falsitati praeparare refugia, ita ut etiam nos cum primum ea legimus, recta vel correcta propemodum gauderemus."

    Pneumatologia

  • When this has been sung he that is seated, as though calling them back, shall say the antiphon Venite et videte locum Come and see the place, and then, rising and lifting up the veil, he shall show them the place void of the Cross and with only the linen in which the Cross had been wrapped.

    The Early Middle Ages 500-1000

  • O vos omnes, qui transitis per viam, attendite et videte! si est dolor similis sicut dolor meus.

    The St. Gregory Hymnal and Catholic Choir Book

  • On her tombstone are carved these words: O vos omnes qui transitis per viam, attendite et videte si est dolor sicut dolor meus.

    The Ruin of a Princess

  • Venite et videte locum; etc. This dialogue was transformed at an early date into a separate interlude following the third lesson of the Easter Matins and representing the visit to the Sepulchre.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

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