Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of vilipend.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He was in a drunken humour — in a sullen humour — in a thoughtless and vilipending humour — in every humour but a fighting one.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • On George’s intercourse with Amelia he put an instant veto—menacing the youth with maledictions if he broke his commands, and vilipending the poor innocent girl as the basest and most artful of vixens.

    XVIII. Who Played on the Piano Captain Dobbin Bought

  • It has been my fate to receive a good deal more vilipending than (I hope) I deserve.

    Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley — Volume 3

  • But a speaker who can certainly be made amenable to authority for vilipending in debate the heart of any specified opponent, may with safety attribute all manner of ill to the agglomerated hearts of a party.

    Phineas Redux

  • But to return to Mr. Romanes: however much he and Mr. Allen may differ about the merits of Mr. Darwin, they were at any rate not long since cordially agreed in vilipending my unhappy self, and are now saying very much what I have been saying for some years past.

    Selections from Previous Works and Remarks on Romanes' Mental Evolution in Animals

  • Richard Hunt was summoned for certain articles implying contempt, and for vilipending his lordship's jurisdiction.

    The Reign of Henry the Eighth, Volume 1 (of 3)

  • No parasite of Maurice could more effectively pay his court and more confidently hope for promotion or reward than by vilipending Barneveld.

    PG Edition of Netherlands series — Complete

  • Amelia he put an instant veto -- menacing the youth with maledictions if he broke his commands, and vilipending the poor innocent girl as the basest and most artful of vixens.

    Vanity Fair

  • I contemn too much the occupation by which I have thriven so well, and hints that I may easily lead other people to follow my opinion in vilipending my talents, and the use I have made of them.

    The Journal of Sir Walter Scott From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford

  • -- He was in a drunken humour -- in a sullen humour -- in a thoughtless and vilipending humour -- in every humour but a fighting one.

    St. Ronan's Well

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