Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. viciousness

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Viciousness; depravity.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state of being vicious or vitiated; a corrupted state; depravation; a vicious property.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin vitiositas, from Latin vitiōsus.

Examples

  • From which we also get 'vitiator' and 'vitiosity' - the state or quality of being vicious.

    Light and Shade

  • I find my growing judgment daily instruct me how to be better, but my untamed affections and confirmed vitiosity make me daily do worse.

    Religio Medici

  • I find my growing Judgment daily instruct me how to be better, but my untamed affections and confirmed vitiosity makes me daily do worse.

    Paras 36-70

  • To shew why this vitiosity and corrupt habit of nature comes to have this denomination of flesh.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. VII.

  • Thus therefore must the corruption and vitiosity of our nature be dealt with.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. VII.

  • Why this vitiosity and corrupt habit of nature comes to have this denomination of flesh: and that for three reasons:

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. VII.

  • The vitiosity of our nature is called flesh, because of its close, inseparable nearness to the soul.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. VII.

  • A third reason why the vitiosity of our nature is called flesh is, because of its dearness to us.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. VII.

  • Meanwhile, we deny not the truth of Augustine's doctrine, that the will is not destroyed, but rather repaired, by grace-the two things being perfectly consistent-viz. that the human will may be said to be renewed when its vitiosity and perverseness being corrected, it is conformed to the true standard of righteousness and that, at the same time, the will may be said to be made new, being so vitiated and corrupted that its nature must be entirely changed.

    Latest Articles

  • 'sinner' and 'sin' in Scripture is used for any person, that hath a fault or a legal impurky, a debt, a vitiosity, defect, or imposition,

    The Literary Remains of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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