Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of vulgarity.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Advertising space on government-run buses is probably a nonpublic forum, and the government may set up reasonable, viewpoint-neutral restrictions on what advertising it will allow there (even if the restrictions are content-based, for instance if all political ads are excluded, or if the ads may not contain vulgarities or nudity).

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Anti-Islam Bus Ads in Miami

  • I whirled around to see Bart, who was staring at Cindy, who'd rolled on top of Lance and was lustily riding him, crying out four-letter word vulgarities in between her moans of ecstasy, entirely unaware of anything but what she was doing and what was being done to her.

    Seeds of Yesterday

  • Thursday night crowds grew to about 200 people, and customers leaving the restaurant were called vulgarities, Crenshaw said.

    AroundTheCapitol.com

  • Alex knows quite a bit of English and knows the equivilent "vulgarities" for many things.

    no mames!

  • Nor is my anger born of the fact that Brann, as warped by his environment of time and place, wasted thought on free silver economics, spent passion on prohibition and negro criminals, lavished wrath on provincial preachers and local politicians or alloyed his style by the so-called "vulgarities," which alone could shock into attention the muddle-headed who paid his printer's bill for the privilege of seeing barnyard phrases and dunghill words in type.

    The Complete Works of Brann the Iconoclast, Volume 1.

  • Our tapes do not contain the kind of vulgarities that Jones experienced.

    OpEdNews

  • You clearly don't know Ken Starr, who is a very gracious person and would not use the kind of vulgarities appearing in your post about anyone, friend or foe.

    HumidCity

  • One day he brought a 40-page tome of "vulgarities" in Spanish for me to have a peek at.

    The Life of I

  • I whirled around to see Bart, who was staring at Cindy, who’d rolled on top of Lance and was lustily riding him, crying out four-letter word vulgarities in between her moans of ecstasy, entirely unaware of anything but what she was doing and what was being done to her.

    Seeds of Yesterday

  • The writing is relatively joke-free, with loud voices and mild vulgarities instead of actual punchlines.

    Marshall Fine: HuffPost Review: Lottery Ticket

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