Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To strike with a waddy or club. See waddy.
  • noun A war-club of heavy wood, grooved in such a way that the edges of the grooves serve as cutting edges to increase the efficacy of the blow: used by the Australian aborigines. Also waddie.
  • noun Hence A walking-stick.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun An aboriginal war club.
  • noun A piece of wood; stick; peg; also, a walking stick.
  • transitive verb To attack or beat with a waddy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun colloquial A cowboy.
  • noun Australia A war club used by Aboriginal Australians; a nulla nulla.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Origin unknown.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Sydney wadi ("stick, weapon").

Examples

  • "No not of fire-arms; but they have a machine of their own that they call a waddy, or something of that sort, which they throw like a harpoon; but the thing takes a twist in the air, and strikes behind them."

    Willis the Pilot

  • They used simple baskets, digging sticks, spears without stone points, and a sort of lightweight club known as a waddy.

    The Song of The Dodo

  • They used simple baskets, digging sticks, spears without stone points, and a sort of lightweight club known as a waddy.

    The Song of The Dodo

  • The waddy was a short piece of wood, reduced and notched towards the grasp, and slightly rounded at the point.

    The History of Tasmania , Volume II

  • He was the loud-mouthed and overbearing kind of waddy -- a gunman first and a cowman afterward.

    Kid Wolf of Texas

  • How he was a noted "waddy," or cattle-rustler; how he and his gang had held up three trains in eighteen months; how he had killed Tom Mooney, Bob

    Wyoming, a Story of the Outdoor West

  • "waddy," torn from the vindictive tree and flung, high and straight into the inoffensive sky, descended flat on the red stump with a gunlike report.

    My Tropic Isle

  • In 1876, while still a young cow waddy, Cook helped drive a herd from the Nueces River deep in southeast Texas all the way to the Dakotas.

    THE AMERICAN WEST

  • Each cow waddy going up the trail had to have six to ten mounts, because horses, like people, possess varied qualifications.

    THE AMERICAN WEST

  • The rich keep kind of marrying each other and so you've got these kids are driving around, big waddy head kids, you know, they have got a BMW, but they have got to have something to keep their head, you know, so it doesn't fall over.

    CNN Transcript Dec 1, 2006

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