Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A loincloth.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A cloth or garment worn around the waist.
  • n. A covering of canvas or tarpaulin for the hammocks, stowed on the nettings, between the quarterdeck and the forecastle.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A cloth or wrapper worn about the waist; by extension, such a garment worn about the hips and passing between the thighs.
  • n. A covering of canvas or tarpaulin for the hammocks, stowed on the nettings, between the quarterdeck and the forecastle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A piece of cloth worn by the natives in India around the waist and hanging below it, and, as often worn, passed between the thighs. Compare dhotee.
  • n. Nautical:
  • n. Hammock-cloths of the waist nettings.
  • n. plural Cloths hung about the cage-work of a ship's hull, to protect the men in action.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a band of material around the waist that strengthens a skirt or trousers

Etymologies

waist +‎ cloth (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Dyak men wear a waistcloth which is made either of the soft inner bark of a tree, or else of cotton cloth.

    Children of Borneo

  • Always turning about and moving with the chorus, she repeats this process again and again, showing more legs and hips every time, until the siapa waistcloth barely hangs on her, and would fall except that she holds it.

    The Five of Hearts

  • "Well, then," Mumtaz says, pulling her record book out from her waistcloth.

    Excerpt: Sold by Patricia McCormick

  • Then he looked at the second ape and saw him fair of form and round of face with pendants of gold in his ears and a blue waistcloth about his middle, and he was like unto a lighted taper.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Izár or waistcloth which was either tied or tucked into a girdle of leather or metal.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Asked Al – Rashid, “Where is thy gaberdine, 220 and where are thy waistcloth and girdle and where be the rest of thy raiment?”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then he pulled it in and found it heavier than before; so he ceased not to tug at it, till he brought it to land, when, behold, there was another ape in it, with front teeth wide apart, 187 Kohl-darkened eyes and hands stained with Henna-dyes; and he was laughing and wore a tattered waistcloth about his middle.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • “Fútah”, a napkin, a waistcloth, the Indian Zones alluded to by the old Greek travellers.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then he drew it in and finding it heavy, laboured at it and ceased not his travail till he got it ashore, when he found in it yet another ape; but this one was red, with a blue waistcloth about his middle; his hands and feet were stained with Henna and his eyes blackened with Kohl.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • A few mats, baskets, and cooking vessels, with plates and basins purchased from the Macassar traders, constitute their whole furniture; spears and bows are their weapons; a sarong or mat forms the clothing of the women, a waistcloth of the men.

    The Malay Archipelago

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