Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found. Check out and contribute to the discussion of this word!

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The narrow room stretches about 70 yards, filled with heavy walnut-wood tables, custom-made leather couches and deep-brown leather-paneled walls.

    Inside the Commissioner's Club

  • Central Park was heartbreakingly beautiful at sunset as we entered it, but not half as beautiful as my new car with its walnut-wood trim, steering-wheel-mounted audio and voice controls and su nroof.

    Driving Like the Other Half

  • The narrow room stretches about 70 yards, filled with heavy walnut-wood tables, custom-made leather couches, deep-brown leather-paneled walls, low-lighting (aside from the flicker of 26 flat screens), and two 10-foot long fireplaces to keep warm.

    Stadium's Club Is a Football Throwback

  • The walnut-wood furniture chosen by the stranger lady was perfectly plain, and the whole charm of the house consisted in its neatness and harmony with its surroundings.

    La Grenadiere

  • The walnut-wood rafters are left visible, and the intervening spaces filled with a kind of white plaster.

    La Grenadiere

  • A shabby, cheap carpet lay in wrinkles at the foot of a curtainless walnut-wood bedstead; dingy curtains, begrimed with cigar smoke and fumes from a smoky chimney, hung in the windows; a

    A Distinguished Provincial at Paris

  • The walls and ceiling of this spacious room were whitewashed, and the furniture consisted of wooden benches like those seen in schools, a clumsy cupboard, a walnut-wood writing-table, and an armchair.

    The Commission in Lunacy

  • The walls and ceiling of this spacious room were whitewashed, and the furniture consisted of wooden benches like those seen in schools, a clumsy cupboard, a walnut-wood writing-table, and an armchair.

    The Commission in Lunacy

  • The carpet was of rich velvet pile, in groups of brilliant flowers, and dotted over with chairs, sofas, and _tête-à-têtes_ of carved walnut-wood, cushioned with the richest green velvet: the tables were of marble with gilded pedestals.

    The Englishwoman in America

  • The curtains and chair-covers are always of very rich damask, frequently worth from two to three guineas a yard; but the richness of this, and of the gold embroidery, is toned down by the dark hue of the walnut-wood furniture.

    The Englishwoman in America

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.