Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The kora, Gallicrex cristata, a large dark gallinule of India, Ceylon, Java, and islands eastward, horned with a red caruncle on top of the head.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Dodd shouted as he saw a water-tank, and a receptacle above it with a water-cock.

    Astounding Stories of Super-Science February 1930

  • _ -- By immediately shutting off both cocks, the water-cock first, then I would open the blow-out cock (at the bottom of the gauge-glass) and keep it open to the finish, and commence unscrewing the nuts, clearing them of any bits of india-rubber that adhered to them, also the sockets.

    The Stoker's Catechism

  • In the pride of being a housewife she loved every detail -- the brocade armchair with the weak back, even the brass water-cock on the hot-water reservoir, when she had become familiar with it by trying to scour it to brilliance.

    Main Street

  • I had turned on the steam - heater after placing a tin under the leaky water-cock -- for perhaps you do not know that water will leak where steam will not.

    A Personal Record

  • I had turned on the steam heater after placing a tin under the leaky water-cock -- for perhaps you do not know that water will leak where steam will not.

    A Personal Record

  • I had turned on the steam-heater after placing a tin under the leaky water-cock -- for perhaps you do not know that water will leak where steam will not.

    Some Reminiscences

  • Every water-cock on the great tower was subject to her.

    St. George and St. Michael Volume II

  • In order to get at a water-cock on the starboard side, the ship had been heeled down on her larboard side, by running her guns over until the lower deck port-sills were just level with the water.

    A Yacht Voyage Round England

  • It had been found the morning before that this water-cock, which was about three feet below the water line, was out of order and must be repaired.

    The Loss of the Royal George

  • But it in quite simple to have carbide present in large excess of the water introduced when the whole generator is contemplated, and yet to have the water always in chemical excess in the desired manner; because to realise the advantages of having water in excess, it is only necessary to subdivide the total charge of carbide into a number of separate charges which are each so small that more than sufficient water to decompose and flood one of them is permitted to enter every time the feed mechanism comes into play, or (in a non-automatic apparatus) every time the water-cock is opened; so arranging the charges that each one is protected from the water till its predecessor, or its predecessor, have been wholly decomposed.

    Acetylene, the Principles of Its Generation and Use

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.