Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Amid the posturing by their interrogators, the bankers, whose well-starched shirts did not seem to wilt during the daylong session, did engender a smidgen of sympathy.

    James Warren: Bankers on the Hill

  • His posture seems as stiff as his well-starched, olive-green straight-leg pants and button-up shirt -- but his white-gloved hands hang loosely at his sides.

    Meghan Peters: Outside China Daily

  • Now of course that's not necessarily bad, but when I spent the afternoon at a Michigan gun show in November, I must say I was personally frightened by the well-starched conformity of the Romney camp - which one might have easily mistaken for the "Political Pez-Dispenser" aisle of the local grocery store.

    Dan Treul: Turning Purple: Michigan Voters Indecisive, Overlooked and Just Plain Unaware

  • The welcoming committee, a band of three middle-aged maunts with well-starched collars and bad teeth, stood at attention.

    Son of a Witch

  • In her hand she held a well-starched shirt which she said she had been sitting up all night to get ready.

    Childhood

  • I had already told a well-starched young member of the State Patrol evelything that I was going to tell him.

    Sign of the Unicorn

  • Major Kovalev had a habit of daily promenading the Nevsky Prospekt in an extremely clean and well-starched shirt and collar, and in whiskers of the sort still observable on provincial surveyors, architects, regimental doctors, other officials, and all men who have round, red cheeks, and play a good hand at ` ` Boston. ''

    Taras Bulba and Other Tales

  • In deference to the seventh day, he exchanged his shirt of blue cotton for a white, well-starched linen one, and donned a high black lasting neck-stock and dark vest, and shaved his face so clean that it reflected his own sunshine if not the solar ray.

    Brook Farm

  • Anna fairly danced about the neat little figure in the well-starched blue linen skirt.

    A Little Maid of Old Maine

  • As they are seated, there is not one point to distinguish them from men: the dressing and powdering of the hair; their well-starched neckcloths; the upper part of their habits, which they always wear, even at a dinner-party, made precisely like men's coats; and regular black beaver men's hats.

    The "Ladies of Llangollen" as Sketched by Many Hands; with Notices of Other Objects of Interest in "That Sweetest of Vales"

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.