Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Given to much drinking of wine.
  • n. Habitual drinking of wine.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The habit of drinking wine to excess; tippling; drunkenness.
  • Drinking much wine; toping.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The whole topos of winebibbing and the flouting of sober outward convention, so dear to Persian Sufi poetry, can seem in earlier translators' work to be little more than a kind of rowdy undergraduate hijinks, and in more recent versions it can take on the ethos of Haight-Ashbury in the late sixties.

    languagehat.com: THE POETRY OF THE INEFFABLE.

  • For winebibbing had not taken possession of her spirit, nor did the love of wine stimulate her to hate the truth, as it does too many, both male and female, who turn as sick at a hymn to sobriety as drunkards do at a draught of water.

    Confessions and Enchiridion, newly translated and edited by Albert C. Outler

  • For what happens nowadays in many cases is highly ridiculous: good slaves are made farmers, or sailors, or merchants, or stewards, or money-lenders; but if they find a winebibbing, greedy, and utterly useless slave, to him parents commit the charge of their sons, whereas the good tutor ought to be such a one as was Phoenix, the tutor of Achilles.

    Plutarch's Morals

  • Thus, a highly discriminating palate may have saved the life of animals and savages, but what can its subtleness do nowadays beyond making us into gormandisers and winebibbers, or, at best, into cooks and tasters for the service of gormandising and winebibbing persons?

    Laurus Nobilis Chapters on Art and Life

  • "Is it your duty, think you, or that of any Christian young man, to bear arms in their cause who have poured out the blood of God's saints in the wilderness as if it had been water? or is it a lawful recreation to waste time in shooting at a bunch of feathers, and close your evening with winebibbing in public-houses and market-towns, when He that is mighty is come into the land with his fan in his hand, to purge the wheat from the chaff?"

    Old Mortality, Complete

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