Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of wog.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Scientologists are taught they are superior to none scientologists, whom they refer to as wogs, so they tend to have a rather elitist view of none believers; remember that according to Tom Cruise they are the ONLY ONES who can help.

    Denver Post: News: Breaking: Local

  • Scientologists are taught they are superior to none scientologists, whom they refer to as wogs, so they tend to have a rather elitist view of none believers; remember that according to Tom Cruise they are the ONLY ONES who can help.

    Denver Post: News: Breaking: Local

  • (Somehow women were never referred to as wogs, either because of their unimportance in Arab societies or their irrelevance in the English one.)

    Hooman Majd: An American Wog on July 4th

  • Whether or not a lot of "wogs" are killed in colonial outposts in its defense is neither here nor there.

    Euro peace: The sounds of silence

  • It is some long time, Mr Middleton,since I've heard anyone use the term 'wogs', but let's let that pass.

    Peter Stothard - Times Online - WBLG:

  • It is some long time, Mr Middleton,since I've heard anyone use the term 'wogs', but let's let that pass.

    Night (not) in the Parthenon Museum 2

  • We saw a group of three "wogs," two girls and a guy, all early twenties, walking along the lower walkway of the Wall.

    Archive 2005-12-01

  • We saw a group of three "wogs," two girls and a guy, all early twenties, walking along the lower walkway of the Wall.

    The Cronulla Mob

  • As red as cardinals, they dynamited unsafe buildings, which turned out to be all of them, so that the island seemed to have been made yet more desolate by their attentions, and further panicking the distraught islanders, who could not distinguish aftershocks from explosions, and whom the sailors, poor on both geography and polite circumlocution, referred to jovially as 'wogs'.

    Captain Corelli's Mandolin

  • Late distinguished post-colonial critic Edward Said would describe what he calls Naipaul's "funny moments ... at the expense of Muslims, who are 'wogs' after all as seen by Naipaul's British and American readers, potential fanatics and terrorists, who cannot spell, be coherent, sound right to a worldly-wise, somewhat jaded judge from the West."

    Geoffrey Philp's Blog Spot

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