Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of won.
  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of wone.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Then we entered the city and found all who therein woned into black stones enstoned: not an inhabited house appeared to the espier, nor was there a blower of fire. 307 We were awe struck at the sight and threaded the market streets where we found the goods and gold and silver left lying in their places; and we were glad and said, “Doubtless there is some mystery in all this.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • So he went in to her and woned with her at Bassorah till there came to them the Destroyer of delights and the Severer of societies; and extolled be the perfection of the

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • And from that hour he woned in peace and tranquillity and all happiness.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • “O Kings of the Age! how cometh it that I woned safely in the land of the Infidels and I am plundered in your realm, though it be the biding place of justice113 and peace?”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • And mourns my heart the bygone days you woned with me,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The Venitian hotel is woned by an orthodox jew, who had special shabbos doors without eloctrinic sensors and good old locks with keys as opposed to the credit card electronic kind to cater to the “frummies”.

    Viva Las Vegas | Jewschool

  • And a man that was among the vines labouring, heard the child bray otherwise than he had heard any, and came running to the mother of the child, and bade her see if she had all her children, for he said that he had heard the cry of a child otherwise than they be woned to cry.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 6

  • And when he lay thereon, he doubted that it was softer than it was which he was woned to lie on, for he was accustomed to lie on the bare ground, and but one coverlet of hair upon his bed.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 6

  • My glance for ever turns toward your hearth and home * And mourns my heart the bygone days you woned with me,

    Arabian nights. English

  • And out of it came a merchant shrieking and crying aloud for succour and saying, "O Kings of the Age! how cometh it that I woned safely in the land of the Infidels and I am plundered in your realm, though it be the biding place of justice [FN#113] and peace?"

    Arabian nights. English

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