Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A sylvan deity.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He rose upon her memory as the fruit-god and the wood-god in alternation; sometimes leafy, and smeared with green lichen, as she had seen him among the sappy boughs of the plantations; sometimes cider-stained, and with apple-pips in the hair of his arms, as she had met him on his return from cider-making in White Hart Vale, with his vats and presses beside him.

    The Woodlanders

  • _Caprimulgus_, the nightly goat-milker and child-killer, and the wood-god Silvanus; the Coptic _Berselia_; the Hungarian

    The Child and Childhood in Folk-Thought Studies of the Activities and Influences of the Child Among Primitive Peoples, Their Analogues and Survivals in the Civilization of To-Day

  • He was at the prime of his strength, the zenith of his beauty and, in the semi-nudity that the climate permitted, more than ever like a young wood-god.

    Angel Island

  • She tried to imagine her wood-god by her side in the saloon of an ocean liner.

    Tarzan of the Apes

  • The boy, perhaps two years older than Aladdin, was big and strong for his age, and bore his shining head like a young wood-god.

    Aladdin O'Brien

  • He was no longer that limb of Satan, that sardonic bully of the desert days, but a gay wood-god intent upon the gentle ways of wooing.

    It, and Other Stories

  • She tried to imagine her wood-god by her side in the saloon of an ocean liner.

    Tarzan of the Apes

  • Messua drew aside humbly -- he was indeed a wood-god, she thought; but as his hand was on the door the mother in her made her throw her arms round

    The Second Jungle Book

  • He rose upon her memory as the fruit-god and the wood-god in alternation; sometimes leafy, and smeared with green lichen, as she had seen him among the sappy boughs of the plantations; sometimes cider-stained, and with apple-pips in the hair of his arms, as she had met him on his return from cider-making in

    The Woodlanders

  • Then the old man declared himself to be the wood-god and disappeared.

    The Hero of Esthonia and Other Studies in the Romantic Literature of That Country

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.