Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of woodmonger.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Alas, his whole estate and life depended on his hatchet; by his hatchet he earned many a fair penny of the best woodmongers or log-merchants among whom he went a-jobbing; for want of his hatchet he was like to starve; and had death but met with him six days after without a hatchet, the grim fiend would have mowed him down in the twinkling of a bedstaff.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • Alas, his whole estate and life depended on his hatchet; by his hatchet he earned many a fair penny of the best woodmongers or log-merchants among whom he went a-jobbing; for want of his hatchet he was like to starve; and had death but met with him six days after without a hatchet, the grim fiend would have mowed him down in the twinkling of a bedstaff.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • For the security of those northern traders, the coal-ships were ordered by my Lord Mayor not to come up into the Pool above a certain number at a time, and ordered lighters and other vessels such as the woodmongers (that is, the wharf-keepers or coal-sellers) furnished, to go down and take out the coals as low as Deptford and Greenwich, and some farther down.

    A Journal Of The Plague Year

  • Why, sir, the woodmongers hire these poor men to go up and down, with their beetles and wedges on their backs, crying, Have ye any wood to cleave? and laugh to see them travel so loaden with wood and iron.

    A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 6

  • Now, sir, if the poor men go two or three days, and are not set a-work (as sometimes they do), the woodmongers pay them, and gain by it, for then know they there's no wood in the city: then raise they the price of billets so high, that the poor can buy none.

    A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 6

  • Alas, his whole estate and life depended on his hatchet; by his hatchet he earned many a fair penny of the best woodmongers or log-merchants among whom he went a-jobbing; for want of his hatchet he was like to starve; and had death but met with him six days after without a hatchet, the grim fiend would have mowed him down in the twinkling of a bedstaff.

    Gargantua and Pantagruel, Illustrated, Book 4

  • Now, sir, if these fellows were barr'd from asking whether there were any wood to cleave or not, the woodmongers need not know but that there were wood, and so billets and faggots would be sold all at one rate.

    A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 6

  • a time, and ordered lighters and other vessels such as the woodmongers

    A Journal of the Plague Year, written by a citizen who continued all the while in London

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