Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of woodpigeon.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There was a wonderful change from yesterday; the golden plover on the flats were not briskly moving on the moistening turf as before, though flocks of woodpigeons were astir.

    Lines in Pleasant Places Being the Aftermath of an Old Angler

  • “Oct. 4, 1874. — 9 hares, 8 pheasants, 3 brace of partridges, 2 couple of rabbits, 3 woodpigeons, 2 waterhens.”

    Records of Woodhall Spa and Neighbourhood Historical, Anecdotal, Physiographical, and Archaeological, with Other Matter

  • Muscicapa flammea was seen at 7,000 feet in pine forests with several Sittae: in these forests and about Bharawul, only one Garrulus was heard, and few woodpigeons were seen.

    Journals of Travels in Assam, Burma, Bhootan, Afghanistan and the Neighbouring Countries

  • The long shadows came stealing out from the sheaves; woodpigeons rose one by one, and flapped off to roost; the western sky was streaked with red, and all the downs and combe bathed in the last sunlight.

    Villa Rubein, and other stories

  • The long shadows came stealing out from the sheaves; woodpigeons rose one by one, and flapped off to roost; the western sky was streaked with red, and all the downs and combe bathed in the last sunlight.

    Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works

  • One told me, not long ago, that the woodpigeons had got at a little patch of young rape, only a few acres in all, which had been uncovered by the drifting snow, and had laid it as bare as if the earth had never been planted.

    Birds in the Calendar

  • The tiller of the soil, whose business brings him in open competition with the natural appetites of such voracious birds, beasts, or insects, regards his rivals from a standpoint which has no room for sentiment; and the woodpigeons are to our farmers, particularly in the well-wooded districts of the West Country, even as Carthage was to Cato the Censor, something to be destroyed.

    Birds in the Calendar

  • At the same time, it seems to be beyond all doubt the fact that huge flocks of woodpigeons reach our shores annually from Scandinavia, and their inroads have had such serious results that it is only by joint action that their numbers can be kept under.

    Birds in the Calendar

  • Here he tells us how, wandering in the forest when a child and falling asleep under the trees, he woke to find himself covered up by woodpigeons with leaves, and alludes to a prevailing rural belief that he was specially favoured by the gods.

    Horace

  • A second glance shows that it is caused by a great flock of woodpigeons.

    Hodge and His Masters

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