Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of woolfel.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "It is such men as he," retorted Micheldene, "who are like rats in a wheat-rick or moths in a woolfels, a harm and a hindrance to all peaceful and honest men."

    The White Company

  • "It is such men as he," retorted Micheldene, "who are like rats in a wheat-rick or moths in a woolfels, a harm and a hindrance to all peaceful and honest men."

    The White Company

  • "It is such men as he," retorted Micheldene, "who are like rats in a wheat-rick or moths in a woolfels, a harm and a hindrance to all peaceful and honest men."

    The White Company

  • Here came the merchandise of all the fair countries which are watered by the Garonne and the Dordogne -- the cloths of the south, the skins of Guienne, the wines of the Medoc -- to be borne away to Hull, Exeter, Dartmouth, Bristol or Chester, in exchange for the wools and woolfels of England.

    The White Company

  • Here came the merchandise of all the fair countries which are watered by the Garonne and the Dordogne -- the cloths of the south, the skins of Guienne, the wines of the Medoc -- to be borne away to Hull, Exeter, Dartmouth, Bristol or Chester, in exchange for the wools and woolfels of England.

    The White Company

  • Here came the merchandise of all the fair countries which are watered by the Garonne and the Dordogne -- the cloths of the south, the skins of Guienne, the wines of the Medoc -- to be borne away to Hull, Exeter, Dartmouth, Bristol or Chester, in exchange for the wools and woolfels of England.

    The White Company

  • Hull, Exeter, Dartmouth, Bristol or Chester, in exchange for the wools and woolfels of England.

    The White Company

  • Dartmouth, Bristol or Chester, in exchange for the wools and woolfels of England.

    The White Company

  • "It is such men as he," retorted Micheldene, "who are like rats in a wheat-rick or moths in a woolfels, a harm and a hindrance to all peaceful and honest men."

    The White Company

  • "It was agreed by parliament," says Cotton, (p. 309), "that the subsidy of wools, woolfels, and skins, granted to the king until the time of midsummer then ensuing, should cease from the same time unto the feast of St. Peter 'ad vincula' for that thereby the king should be interrupted for claiming such grant as due."

    The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part B. From Henry III. to Richard III.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.