Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of wuther.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • How it "wuthered" and how the big raindrops poured down and beat against the pane!

    The Secret Garden

  • How it "wuthered" and how the big raindrops poured down and beat against the pane!

    The Secret Garden

  • How it "wuthered" and how the big raindrops poured down and beat against the pane!

    The Secret Garden

  • The wind wuthered so I couldn't go to sleep and I heard some one crying and wanted to find out who it was.

    The Secret Garden

  • The wind wuthered so I couldn't go to sleep and I heard some one crying and wanted to find out who it was.

    The Secret Garden

  • The wind wuthered so I couldn't go to sleep and I heard some one crying and wanted to find out who it was.

    The Secret Garden

  • From time to time the wind wuthered in the chimney at his back; from time to time there swept over Bloomsbury a squall so dark that he must rise and light the gas; about him was the chill and the mean disorder of a house out of commission — the floor bare, the sofa heaped with books and accounts enveloped in a dirty table – cloth, the pens rusted, the paper glazed with a thick film of dust; and yet these were but adminicles of misery, and the true root of his depression lay round him on the table in the shape of misbegotten forgeries.

    The Wrong Box

  • -- tha should just ha seen him; he ommost lauped clean ower th 'breead flaik; -- an' thear shoo stood grinning at him throo th 'winder, an' he wor soa mad -- he wuthered th 'pan fair at her head; -- he miss'd his aim an' knock'd th 'canary cage to smithereens, th' cat gate th 'burd, an' th 'pan fell into th' churn.

    Yorksher Puddin' A Collection of the Most Popular Dialect Stories from the Pen of John Hartley

  • From time to time the wind wuthered in the chimney at his back; from time to time there swept over Bloomsbury a squall so dark that he must rise and light the gas; about him was the chill and the mean disorder of a house out of commission -- the floor bare, the sofa heaped with books and accounts enveloped in a dirty table-cloth, the pens rusted, the paper glazed with a thick film of dust; and yet these were but adminicles of misery, and the true root of his depression lay round him on the table in the shape of misbegotten forgeries.

    The Wrong Box

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