Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of wyte.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And wyted him deal of their woes; nor then might he 1150

    The Tale of Beowulf Sometime King of the Folk of the Weder Geats

  • 'I did wyte then!' she cried 'I wyted till near eight before I got your old telegraph!

    Victorian Short Stories of Troubled Marriages

  • ` ` That's the Reiver's mother, '' said one of the Elliots; ` ` she's ten times waur than himself, and is wyted for muckle of the ill he does about the country. ''

    The Black Dwarf

  • First I had to herd the sheep and take them to the best grass, and whiles they strayed and were wearisome to me, and I came home with divers missing, and then would I be wyted or even whipped for what was no fault of mine.

    The Sundering Flood

  • "That's the Reiver's mother," said one of the Elliots; "she's ten times waur than himsell, and is wyted for muckle of the ill he does about the country."

    The Black Dwarf

  • Man it is difent he his throughin in to the varitey of Business & for gets for the time that they are Such a thing as love, or that he has a loving wife at home wayting anxiously for him to come & when he dos come he has no tender word of affection for the one who has wyted So pacately for him were She Expected to See a smile She Sees a frown he comes in takes of his hat Sets down & is Silent has no word of greeting for his wife what is the feelings of that wife no one has any Idea but those who has Experienced Such treetment. bouth husband & wife should Strive to make the home circle bright & Cheerful & it depends in a greate measure apon the wife to make it so.

    Augusta County: David H. Evans to Mary Anna Sibert, September 15, 1868

  • “That’s the Reiver’s mother,” said one of the Elliots; “she’s ten times waur than himsell, and is wyted for muckle of the ill he does about the country.”

    The Black Dwarf

  • "S'y, we never wyted to hear no more, but hyked awye hot foot.

    A Deal in Wheat and Other Stories of the New and Old West

  • Ere she could explain, "Hold your tongue, girl," said Catherine; "Muriel bade him sat down, and I knew not that, and wyted on him; and he was going and leaving his malison on us, root and branch.

    The Cloister and the Hearth

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.