Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Obsolete spelling of yolk.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Same as yolk.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A manufacturers' term in Lancashire, England, for one of the hard, stony lumps found in slaked lime from a Buxton limestone.
  • n. A variant of yolk.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It contains a mass of viscid nutritive matter -- the 'yelk' -- within which is inclosed a second much more delicate spheroidal bag, called the 'germinal vesicle' (a).

    Lectures and Essays

  • Special names have been given to these parts of the ovum; the cell-body is called the yelk (vitellus), and the cell-nucleus the germinal vesicle.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • The space between the skin-layer and the gut-layer (the remainder of the segmentation-cavity) remains full of food-yelk, which is gradually used up.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • But while in the ova with discoid gastrulation the formative yelk is not in the centre, but at one pole of the uni-axial ovum, and the food-yelk gathered at the other pole, in the ova with superficial cleavage we find the formative yelk spread over the whole surface of the ovum; it encloses spherically the food-yelk, which is accumulated in the middle of the ova.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • From the tread a thin column of the white yelk penetrates through the yellow yelk to the centre of the globular cell, where it swells into a small, central globule (wrongly called the yelk-cavity, or latebra, Figure 1.15 d apostrophe).

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • In the upper part of the yelk is the transparent round germinal vesicle, which corresponds to the nucleus.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • The remains of the yelk, which have not yet been applied to the nutrition and growth of the young animal, are contained in a sac attached to the rudimentary intestine, and termed the yelk sac, or 'umbilical vesicle.'

    On the Relations of Man to the Lower Animals

  • The remains of the yelk, which have not yet been applied to the nutrition and growth of the young animal, are contained in a sac attached to the rudimentary intestine, and termed the yelk sac, or

    Lectures and Essays

  • The very young puppy, with attached ends of the yelk-sac and allantois, and invested in the amnion.

    Essays

  • But, exactly in those respects in which the developing Man differs from the Dog, he resembles the ape, which, like man, has a spheroidal yelk-sac and a discoidal — sometimes partially lobed — placenta.

    Essays

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