Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Alternative spelling of yeshiva.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an academy for the advanced study of Jewish texts (primarily the Talmud)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Then again, I did not have the advantage of a yeshivah education so I could be mistaken.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » A Thought on American Jewish Demography

  • Then again, I did not have the advantage of a yeshivah education so I could be mistaken.yankevQuote

    The Volokh Conspiracy » A Thought on American Jewish Demography

  • Practically, that meant that female yeshivah graduates were restricted to the types of studies their female ancestors were exposed to — with Bible being the most advanced subject — although they would learn their Torah with greater intensity and sophistication.

    Orthodox Judaism in the United States.

  • Her father, Avrom Punsky (1906 – 1977), born in Visoki Dvor (today Aukstadvaris), Lithuania, where he received a traditional Jewish education (heder and yeshivah), emigrated to Mexico in 1924 and earned his living as a merchant.

    Chava Turniansky.

  • As Schenirer saw it, the best young men were still under the safe influence of the yeshivah.

    Orthodox Judaism in the United States.

  • The ultra-Orthodox schools prepare young women for their role not only as mothers but also as breadwinners, while their husbands devote themselves to Talmud study in a yeshivah.

    Jewish Education in the United States.

  • This rising influence was fed by the euphoria of the Six Day War, the massive transition to extensive settlement activity throughout Judea and Samaria (which was highly esteemed in religious Zionist circles) and the impressive development of religious education in Israel, with the establishment of the Bnei Akiva yeshivah system, the Hesder yeshivot (incorporating military service with traditional studies), seminaries for high-school girls, and pre-military academies.

    Modesty and Sexuality in Halakhic Literature.

  • Beginning in 1932 she served as director of the Dance Education Department of the Bureau of Jewish Education, which sought to augment Jewish education with non-yeshivah type activities such as music, dance and crafts, in order to promote Hebrew as a modern language.

    Israeli Folk Dance Pioneers in North America.

  • Beginning in the late 1960s, this ethic of modesty changed significantly, due to the increasing influence on the religious Zionist society of the Merkaz ha-Rav school (after the yeshivah by this name).

    Modesty and Sexuality in Halakhic Literature.

  • In a work incorporated in a book by Josef ben Gershom of Rosheim (1478 – 1554), Johanan Luria described Rabbanit Miriam as a teacher who “sat in the yeshivah behind a curtain and taught the law to some outstanding young men.”

    Learned Women in Traditional Jewish Society.

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