Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete Hippocras.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Furthermore, when these have had their course which nature yieldeth, sundry sorts of artificial stuff as ypocras and wormwood wine must in like manner succeed in their turns, beside stale ale and strong beer, which nevertheless bear the greatest brunt in drinking, and are of so many sorts and ages as it pleaseth the brewer to make them.

    Chronicle and Romance (The Harvard Classics Series)

  • Furthermore, when these have had their course which nature yieldeth, sundry sorts of artificial stuff as ypocras and wormwood wine must in like manner succeed in their turns, beside stale ale and strong beer, which nevertheless bear the greatest brunt in drinking, and are of so many sorts and ages as it pleaseth the brewer to make them.

    Of the Food and Diet of the English. Chapter VI. [1577, Book III., Chapter 1; 1587, Book II., Chapter 6

  • Turnesole [39] is good & holsom for red wyne colowryng {e}: all {e} þese ingredyent {es}, þey ar for ypocras makyng {e}.

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • Waffurs to ete/ypocras to drynk w {i} t {h} delite.

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • Rede wyne, a tonne /Claret wyne, a pipe; whit wyne, a hogg {is} hede /ypocras xl. galons.

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • And vndur eu {er} y bagge, good soñ, a basou {n} cler {e} & bryght; and now is þe ypocras made/for to plese many a wight. þe draff of þe spicery/is good for Sewes in kychyn diȝt; and ȝiff þow cast hit awey, þow dost þy mastir no riȝt.

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • [Sidenote: Put the Ypocras in a tight clean vessel, and serve it with wafers.] ++Now, good son, þyne ypocras is made p {ar} fite & well {e};

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • Fygges of malyke, & raysyns, [O]  dates capte w {i} t {h} mynced gynger/wafers and ypocras, they ben agreable/this feest is done, voyde ye the table.

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • Mithridates, who had made himself poison-proof, gave us the now forgotten word ‘mithridate’, for antidote; as from Hippocrates we derived ‘hipocras’, or ‘ypocras’, a word often occurring in our early poets, being a wine supposed to be mingled after his receipt.

    English Past and Present

  • Suppose that bumper which his golden footman brings him, instead i'fackins of ypocras or canary, contains some abomination of senna?

    Roundabout Papers

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