Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Dried tofu skin; the film that forms on top of a vat of boiling soy milk.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Japanese 湯葉, ゆば (yuba)

Examples

  • A yuba is a milk skin—the solid film that forms, as anyone who has ever made hot chocolate knows, when milk is boiled.

    The Sorcerer’s Apprentices

  • A yuba is a milk skin—the solid film that forms, as anyone who has ever made hot chocolate knows, when milk is boiled.

    The Sorcerer’s Apprentices

  • For it, yogurt air—yogurt that has been turned into an ethereal mousse by shooting it through a siphon—is piped onto a yuba, which is then rolled up and dusted with sugar.

    The Sorcerer’s Apprentices

  • For it, yogurt air—yogurt that has been turned into an ethereal mousse by shooting it through a siphon—is piped onto a yuba, which is then rolled up and dusted with sugar.

    The Sorcerer’s Apprentices

  • Today that way includes simmering soy milk to create the delicate tofu skins the Japanese call "yuba."

    The Seattle Times

  • Oriol spends a good five minutes delineating mistakes: the yuba is touching the gnocchi, the capers are touching the yuba, the coffee beans are not equidistant from one another.

    The Sorcerer’s Apprentices

  • This is the trickiest step in the whole process: getting the yuba to lie flat and wrinkle-free, without tearing.

    The Sorcerer’s Apprentices

  • Jorge spoons a bit of saffron-infused cream on top of the two strips of yuba.

    The Sorcerer’s Apprentices

  • Yamaoka pushes them towards reconciliation by showing them a really odd French way to prepare yuba (tofu skin), as an example of how boundaries can be crossed deliciously.

    *Oishinbo a la Carte 7: Izakaya: Pub Food — Recommended » Manga Worth Reading

  • The newish restaurant Cocoron (meaning "heartwarming" in Japanese) on the Lower East Side, run by husband and wife Yoshihito Kida and Mika Ohie, preaches the soba-health gospel with deep bowls of the stuff topped with nutrient-rich yuba (tofu skin, $13-$14) and tororo (sticky Japanese yam, plus wakame seaweed, $8.50-$10), served both hot and cold; there's also a tsukemen style where you dip cold noodles into hot broth or curry ($8.80-$14.50).

    Noodles With Nutrients

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.