zooarchaeologist love

zooarchaeologist

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun a scholar of zooarchaeology

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Dwight is the kind of zooarchaeologist we all aspire to be, with an absolutely astounding, encyclopedic understanding of issues and data in California zooarchaeology.

    Archive 2007-03-01

  • Dwight is the kind of zooarchaeologist we all aspire to be, with an absolutely astounding, encyclopedic understanding of issues and data in California zooarchaeology.

    Opening Day at the Society for California Archaeology

  • I briefly sat with Dwight Simons, California zooarchaeologist extraordinaire, who I've known for some time.

    Archive 2007-03-01

  • I briefly sat with Dwight Simons, California zooarchaeologist extraordinaire, who I've known for some time.

    Opening Day at the Society for California Archaeology

  • Darcy Morey, a zooarchaeologist from the University of Tennessee at Martin, focuses on the archaeological evidence of canine-human companionship, shown most clearly by dog burials.

    Burying Man's Best Friend

  • Rissa recruited a Canadian zooarchaeologist named Sheelagh Frame, who had just finished her Ph.

    The Goddess and the Bull

  • The ranks swelled even more in 1995, with the arrival of two archaeologists from the University of California at Berkeley: zooarchaeologist Nerissa Russell, who was teaming up with Louise Martin to study the animal bones, and Mirjana “Mira” Stevanovic, a flamboyant and acerbic Serbian archaeologist with lots of experience excavating Neolithic houses in southeastern Europe.

    The Goddess and the Bull

  • The faunal team was still puzzling over the meaning of the cattle data from Çatalhöyük when it received a visit, in late July 2001, from Hijlke Buitenhuis, a Dutch zooarchaeologist who was handling the animal bones from the recent excavations at Aşikli Höyük and Musular, in Cappadocia.

    The Goddess and the Bull

  • With a few notable exceptions, such as her bone mentor Richard Meadow, most faunal experts tended to look at domesticated animals as “walking larders,” as the British zooarchaeologist Juliet Clutton Brock titled one of her books.

    The Goddess and the Bull

  • Jean Hudson, a zooarchaeologist at UW-Milwaukee, says she studies animal remains "to better understand past human behaviors and beliefs."

    From the President: Talking Turkey

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