Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • suffix Used to form the names of metal elements, after the style of early-named elements, as well as the isotopes of hydrogen.
  • suffix By extension, appended to common words to create scientific-sounding or humorous-sounding fictional substance names.
  • suffix Used to indicate the setting where a given activity is carried out: gymnasium, auditorium, stadium, colloquium, planetarium, podium, sanatorium. Words so formed often take "-a" for the plural.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin -um ("neuter singular morphological suffix"), based on Latin terms for metals, such as ferrum.

Examples

  • Jarrod: "Which would mean 'aluminum' wouldn't have to end in '-ium.'"

    Laurence Watts: You Say 'Aluminum,' I Say 'Aluminium'

  • Every other element in the periodic group it's in ends in '-ium.'

    Laurence Watts: You Say 'Aluminum,' I Say 'Aluminium'

  • Jarrod, studying his iPhone: "But so is tin, and that doesn't end in '-ium.'"

    Laurence Watts: You Say 'Aluminum,' I Say 'Aluminium'

  • You can often tell whether a product contains quats by looking in the ingredient list for the names of chemicals ending in “-ium chloride” or “-ium bromide”—for example, cetyldimethylbenzyl-ammonium chloride or cetylpyridinium chloride.

    HOME COMFORTS

  • You can often tell whether a product contains quats by looking in the ingredient list for the names of chemicals ending in “-ium chloride” or “-ium bromide”—for example, cetyldimethylbenzyl-ammonium chloride or cetylpyridinium chloride.

    HOME COMFORTS

  • You can often tell whether a product contains quats by looking in the ingredient list for the names of chemicals ending in “-ium chloride” or “-ium bromide”—for example, cetyldimethylbenzyl-ammonium chloride or cetylpyridinium chloride.

    HOME COMFORTS

  • You can often tell whether a product contains quats by looking in the ingredient list for the names of chemicals ending in “-ium chloride” or “-ium bromide”—for example, cetyldimethylbenzyl-ammonium chloride or cetylpyridinium chloride.

    HOME COMFORTS

  • Jarrod: "Which would mean 'aluminum' wouldn't have to end in '-ium.'"

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • Jarrod, studying his iPhone: "But so is tin, and that doesn't end in '-ium.'"

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • Every other element in the periodic group it's in ends in '-ium.'

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

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