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Examples

  • Nevertheless, Brookner's measured tone, her precision, and her disregard for obvious poetic devices make her writing strikingly spare.

    A Close Read

  • Brookner's most effective use of economy in this paragraph, however, may be the final statement: in its very simplicity it undercuts the paragraphs of involved self-reflection that precede it.

    A Close Read

  • Edith Hope, the heroine of Anita Brookner's Booker Prize-winning Hotel du Lac (1984), wrote conventional romance novels based on Aesop's tortoise and hare, while acknowledging that "it is the hare who wins" in real life.

    Fortress of Solitude

  • For true fans, Brookner's books manage to generate boundless excitement while relying on nothing beyond the writer's formidable intelligence, a denatured energy that can't be contained despite the best efforts of her stupendously repressed characters.

    Fortress of Solitude

  • Among Brookner's characters there has not been a Hope for more than a decade.

    Fortress of Solitude

  • What's clear is that like Joseph Cornell's boxes and Nicholson Baker's paeans to card catalogues, nail clippers, and other everyday objects, Brookner's novels have become obsessive miniatures that work best if you accept them on their own strange terms.

    Fortress of Solitude

  • She can mock religion, one of Brookner's favorite targets: how, she asks, had such an angry Father had such a "charming Son?"

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • The moment of dramatic disclosure in Brookner's novels is often the payoff, the entertainment that allows the reader a smile at the heroine's expense.

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • Her mother's new future is to be divided between an elegant part of Kensington (Brookner's characters always live above the purses of most of her readers) and Simon's more modern home on the outskirts of Nice.

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • Reviewers rejoiced: we had missed the nuanced irony and deliciously unveiled self-deception of those works, in which Brookner's feline wit is most fetchingly displayed.

    The Mistress of Gloom

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