Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of or relating to the inhabitants of ancient Caria, their culture, or their language.
  • n. An inhabitant of ancient Caria.
  • n. The extinct Anatolian language of the Carians, known from scattered funerary inscriptions.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A native or inhabitant of ancient Caria.
  • proper n. An extinct Indo-European language in the Anatolian subgroup.
  • adj. Of, or relating to Caria, or its people, language or culture.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or belonging to the ancient kingdom and province of Caria, in the southwestern part of Asia Minor.
  • n. A native of Caria, or the language of the primitive people of Caria, who were dispossessed by the Greeks.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Caria +‎ -an

Examples

  • The skull and gold jewelry found in the tomb of an aristocratic lady of Halicarnassus of the fourth century B.C., the so-called Carian princess, indicating the kind of ornaments that Artemisia might have worn.

    The Battle of Salamis

  • I imagine Artemisia wearing the jewelry found in the fourth century B.C. tomb of an elite woman of Halicarnassus, the so-called Carian Princess.

    The Battle of Salamis

  • English it is generally intransitive, meaning to be careful or thoughtful; it is from the Anglo-Saxon 'Carian'; it became obsolete in the seventeenth century.

    The Early Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson

  • The citadel of the town was formidable, especially as it was occupied by more than a thousand Carian and Greek mercenaries—but soldiers of fortune are nothing if not practical.

    Alexander the Great

  • He had briefly joined a revolt of the satraps of Asia Minor in the 360s, but was soon forgiven and spent the remainder of his reign increasing Carian power in the region while remaining loyal to Persia.

    Alexander the Great

  • The satrap had recently seized the Carian throne from his sister, Ada, and now wanted to make sure his position was secure if Philip made it as far as Halicarnassus.

    Alexander the Great

  • Most famous of these monarchs was Mausolus, who, following a custom Carian royalty shared with Egyptian pharaohs and Persian kings, had married his sister.

    Alexander the Great

  • The stalemate dragged on as summer turned to autumn and the fierce heat of the Carian coast began to wane.

    Alexander the Great

  • He then moved the Carian capital from the inland town of Mylasa to Halicarnassus.

    Alexander the Great

  • FORMAT/CLASSIFICATION: "Stealing Fire" stands at about 300 pages and is narrated by former stable boy Lydias of Miletus, half Carian, half Greek by blood, who later becomes a cavalry officer in Alexander's army.

    "Stealing Fire" by Jo Graham (Reviewed by Liviu Suciu)

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.