Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • Greek philosopher who succeeded Zeno as head of the Stoic school. His most famous work is a hymn to Zeus.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun ancient Greek philosopher who succeeded Zeno of Citium as the leader of the Stoic school (300-232 BC)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Another to also come in and give some advice was the peerless Pedant General-in-Ordinary, later known as Cleanthes, of The Select, who gave me some barked orders on what to do with my bleedin' template and then added: "Now retire to the mess for tea and biscuits."

    Archive 2008-11-01

  • Another to also come in and give some advice was the peerless Pedant General-in-Ordinary, later known as Cleanthes, of The Select, who gave me some barked orders on what to do with my bleedin' template and then added: "Now retire to the mess for tea and biscuits."

    [how this blog began] well ...

  • The Stoics used Heraclitus 'physics as the inspiration for their own, understanding him to advocate a periodic destruction of the world by fire, followed by a regeneration of the world; Cleanthes in particular commented on Heraclitus.

    Doctor, My Eyes

  • The essentials of Epictetus 'thought derive from the early or foundational period of Stoicism, from the third-century writings of Zeno of Citium, Cleanthes, and Chrysippus.

    Epictetus

  • Finally, and along the same lines the previous point, even if we grant that there is one (or more) divine designer, the argument from design does not show that the designer has the perfections Cleanthes and his fellow Christians attribute to God.

    Kant and Hume on Morality

  • On the Possibles, and he also mentions reading in works by Zeno, Cleanthes, Antipater, and Archedemus.

    Epictetus

  • Zeno's answer was "a good flow of life" (Arius Didymus, 63A) or "living in agreement," and Cleanthes clarified that with the formulation that the end was "living in agreement with nature" (Arius Didymus, 63B).

    Stoicism

  • In other words, the argument from design does not prove the existence of the kind of God that Cleanthes and his real-world counterparts want it to (DCNR V).

    Kant and Hume on Morality

  • Cleanthes states that if you look at the world, you will see that it is

    Kant and Hume on Morality

  • They will tell me that even this passage proves that the system of Copernicus was already in the head of Cleanthes and others — of what import is it whether Aristarchus the Samian was of the opinion of Cleanthes, or his accuser, as the Jesuit

    A Philosophical Dictionary

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