Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun biblical A daughter of Jacob and Leah.
  • proper noun A female given name of biblical origin. Alternative form of Dina.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Hebrew דִּינָה "judged, vindicated".

Examples

  • DINAH - The Old Testament Dinah - pronounced dye-nah - was the daughter of Jacob and Leah whose story was popularized by the novel "The Red Tent."

    Pamela Redmond Satran: Baby Names: Ten Underrated Beauties

  • Genesis 34: 2 reports that he sees Dinah, takes her (the Hebrew word for “take” is often used for taking a wife), lies with her (a euphemism for sexual intercourse), and shames her (the NRSV combines the last two verbs, rendering “lay with her by force,” a reading that should be contested).

    Dinah: Bible.

  • "Father said we have plenty of time," and at the word Dinah set out to get weighed.

    The Bobbsey Twins in the Country

  • The name Dinah is about the same in meaning as Dan and could mean "Vindication."

    Exposition of Genesis: Volume 1

  • When the work was complete they called Dinah in to admire it, which she did standing near the doorway with her fat hands resting on her hips.

    The Bobbsey Twins; or, Merry Days Indoors and Out

  • Affy or Dinah is seen bargaining for her sweet potatoes or her bananas, assuredly here will be found successful speculation.

    Sketches in Charleston, South Carolina

  • Told in Dinah’s voice, this novel reveals the traditions and turmoils of ancient womanhood – the world of the red tent.

    The Red Tent (Two thumbs up)

  • Alick said everybody was gone to church “but th’ young missis” — so he called Dinah — but this did not disappoint Adam, although the “everybody” was so liberal as to include Nancy the dairymaid, whose works of necessity were not unfrequently incompatible with church-going.

    Adam Bede

  • But what caused Faith and Kane to look at each other in surprise was the single word Dinah had written and twice circled at the bottom of the page: Blackmail "Blackmail," Tim Daniels said, "is a nasty business, and the kind of dirt men pay to keep under the rug tends to be bad enough to provide a motive for murder."

    Hiding in the Shadows

  • "What's de matter down dere?" called Dinah from the window above.

    The Bobbsey Twins at the Seashore

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