Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A florid, ornate literary style, often employing elaborate puns and conceits.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A florid literary style with many puns etc.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An affected elegance or euphuism of style, for which the Spanish poet Gongora y Argote (1561-1627), among others of his time, was noted.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A kind of affected elegance of style introduced into Spanish literature in imitation of that of the Spanish poet Góngora y Argote (1561—1627).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an affected elegance of style that was introduced into Spanish literature by the poet Gongora

Etymologies

After Luis de Góngora y Argote (1561-1627), Spanish poet.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Luis de Góngora, Spanish poet. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The origins of Euphuism and of that later form of preciousness which is sometimes called Gongorism and sometimes Marinism have been much discussed, but the last word has certainly not been said on them.

    A History of Elizabethan Literature

  • Spain was also easily assimilable, since “Gongorism” — the involved style of

    BAROQUE IN LITERATURE

  • Seville cathedral, did his share as editor by writing two prefaces, one addressed to Sarmiento de Mendoza, and the other to Olivares who was manifestly expected to pronounce against Gongorism.

    Fray Luis de León A Biographical Fragment

  • Quevedo, who had obtained his copies of Luis de Leon's verses from Manuel Sarmiento de Mendoza, a canon of Seville cathedral, did his share as editor by writing two prefaces, one addressed to Sarmiento de Mendoza, and the other to Olivares who was manifestly expected to pronounce against Gongorism.

    Fray Luis de Leon

  • For some reason not very obvious this collection of verses was not published till 1631 when it was issued by Quevedo, who hoped that it would help to stem the current of Gongorism in Spain.

    Fray Luis de Leon

  • Gongorism and its stylistic excesses, as he clearly shows in his

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • Gongorism of many passages in Calderon's best pieces, their obscurity and extravagant bombast, should be charged to the account of a meddlesome collector and editor, that is, to Vera Tasis, and not to

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 3: Brownson-Clairvaux

  • The taint of Gongorism and Marinism attacked all the Seiscentistas, as may be seen in the "Fenix Renascida", and rhetoric conquered style.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • To Gongorism above all other things may be ascribed the wretched decay in letters which ensued upon the end of the seventeenth century: this canker-worm ate into the heart of literature and brought about its corruption.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • Gongorism, and they spread to all forms of composition.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

Comments

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  • MY 2 cents: I normally paraphrase via my understanding of course, with a tinge of digression, only to ramify our knowledge (and I like to read my writing).

    A style of Baroque verse characterized by pretentious
    prolixity and circumlocutious syntax, to obfuscate meaning.
    Gongorism is an eponym derived from Don Luis de Góngora y Argote.
    A synonym for Gongorism is Culteranismo.

    December 18, 2010