Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A termination of several English words from the Latin, representing a comparative formation not felt in English use. Examples are minister, sinister, etc.
  • n. A suffix, a variant of -ist, occurring in chorister, palmister, sophister, and other words now obsolete, as alchemister. It may exist also in the English formation barrister.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Since the Greek poet Hesiod in the eighth century B.C. the Mediterranean world had known that the distant Danube—which the Greeks called by the Thracian name Ister—was one of the great rivers of the world.

    Alexander the Great

  • The Ister, which is the greatest of all the rivers which we know, flows always with equal volume in summer and winter alike.

    The History of Herodotus

  • On the west are the Germans and the river Vistula; on the arctic side, namely the north, it is surrounded by Ocean; on the south by Persis, Albania, Hiberia, Pontus and the farthest channel of the Ister, which is called the Danube all the way from mouth to source.

    The Origin and Deeds of the Goths

  • For as to the land about the Euxine Sea, which extends from Byzantium to the Lake, it would be impossible to tell everything with precision, since the barbarians beyond the Ister River, which they also call the Danube, make the shore of that sea quite impossible for the Romans to traverse -- except, indeed, that from Byzantium to the mouth of the Ister is a journey of twenty-two days, which should be added to the measure of Europe by one making the computation.

    History of the Wars, Books III and IV (of 8) The Vandalic War

  • I was reading Babette Babich's paper on The Ister, the documentary, for next month's Heidegger Circle, and at the end there's Hölderlin's poem, with a translation "attuned to word order".

    enowning

  • Argonauts sail up the Ister, by a branch of which they make their way into the Adriatic, where they find their progress barred by the Colchians, who had come by a shorter route (294 – 337). —

    The Argonautica

  • There is a river, the uttermost horn of Ocean, broad and exceeding deep, that a merchant ship may traverse; they call it Ister and have marked it far off; and for a while it cleaves the boundless tilth alone in one stream; for beyond the blasts of the north wind, far off in the Rhipaean mountains, its springs burst forth with a roar.

    The Argonautica

  • The Argonauts sail up the Ister, by a branch of which they make their way into the Adriatic, where they find their progress barred by the Colchians, who had come by a shorter route (294 – 337). —

    The Argonautica

  • Ister, by name Peuce, three-cornered, its base stretching along the coast, and with a sharp angle towards the river; and round it the outfall is cleft in two.

    The Argonautica

  • I first across Nancy in the interviews in The Ister movie.

    enowning

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