Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Received MediaSentry (A Kempe) email via TPG (Australian ISP) today for District 9 – same as JAson.

    MediaSentry operates in Australia: confirmed

  • The correspondence is signed by, you guessed it, ‘A Kempe MediaSentry Operations’

    MediaSentry operates in Australia: confirmed

  • Mr. Kempe's point is that Kennedy's indecisiveness in the early stages of the crisis produced the wall itself, an exponential increase in East-West tension, and, in the half-century that followed, other fateful consequences that included the Cuban missile crisis—and, though Mr. Kempe doesn't say so, the Vietnam War, along with social and strategic spores that lodged in the American psyche and darkened world opinion with results yet to be revealed.

    When Kennedy Blinked

  • It also provided, as Mr. Kempe puts it in the final sentence of this mind-shaking work of investigative history, an example "of what unfree systems can impose when free leaders fail to resist."

    When Kennedy Blinked

  • Mr. Kempe, president of the Atlantic Council and a former chief diplomatic correspondent of The Wall Street Journal, describes this as "the first mistake of the Kennedy presidency."

    When Kennedy Blinked

  • As for Khrushchev, Mr. Kempe writes, the new U.S. president had lived down to his lowest expectations. . .

    When Kennedy Blinked

  • As Mr. Kempe puts it: "In perhaps the most important manhood moment of his presidency, Kennedy had made a unilateral concession."

    When Kennedy Blinked

  • "Between doses," Mr. Kempe writes, pondering what effect the injections might have had on Kennedy's behavior in Vienna, "his mood could swing violently from overconfidence to bouts of depression."

    When Kennedy Blinked

  • First and foremost, Kempe dives into his rich narrative that plots the back and forth between the superpowers month to month and day to day.

    Michael Giltz: Books: Berlin, 1961: The Most Dangerous Place On Earth

  • Kempe details the almost miraculous feat of East Germany throwing up a barrier overnight throughout the entire city of Berlin, a barrier that would soon become the Berlin Wall.

    Michael Giltz: Books: Berlin, 1961: The Most Dangerous Place On Earth

Comments

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  • "many white things flying all about her on every side as thick as motes in a sunbeam" not

    September 3, 2011