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Examples

  • Perdita is allowed to realize Claire's fantasy of marrying Byron/Raymond, but must suffer his infidelity with the Greek princess Evadne and then commit suicide after her husband's death.

    Paley, "Apocalypse Without Millennium"

  • The imaginative Perdita is described in terms of one of the artistic touchstones of the era and Mary's personal favourite [33] -- "she was like one of Guido's saints"

    Paley, "Apocalypse Without Millennium"

  • Besides, he pinned a paper to its mantle upon which the name Perdita was written.

    The Children's Portion

  • Our prime festivals were held in Perdita's cottage; nor were we ever weary of talking of the past or dreaming of the future.

    I.6

  • I found this vision of beauty in Perdita's alcove, in earnest conversation with its inmate.

    I.4

  • But in Perdita he possessed all that his heart could desire.

    I.8

  • A figure fairly tall, in a grey riding-habit, stupendously well cut; a face not quite so round as a child's nor so shaped as a woman's, blushing slightly, very calm; crinkly light-brown hair tied back with a black ribbon under a neat hat; and eyes like those eyes of Gainsborough's 'Perdita' -- slow, grey, mesmeric, with long lashes curling up, eyes that draw things to them, still innocent.

    Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works

  • Polixenes then reproached his son for daring to contract himself to this low-born maiden, calling Perdita “shepherd’s-brat, sheep-hook, ” and other disrespectful names; and threatening, if ever she suffered his son to see her again, he would put her, and the old shepherd her father, to a cruel death.

    The Winter’s Tale

  • That Raymond should marry Idris was more than ever intolerable; yet my passion, though a giant from its birth, was too strange, wild, and impracticable, for me to feel at once the misery I perceived in Perdita.

    I.4

  • Polixenes then reproached his son for daring to contract himself to this low-born maiden, calling Perdita "shepherd's-brat, sheep-hook," and other disrespectful names; and threatening, if ever she suffered his son to see her again, he would put her, and the old shepherd her father, to

    Tales from Shakespeare

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  • "Lost Island" or Brendan's Island

    Christopher Columbus was most probably aware of the Brendan legend as well as of such classic medieval descriptions of the “Lost Island,” or Perdita, as that of Honorius of Autun (or more exactly, William of Conches) - Thomas Merton

    August 28, 2011