Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • Sultan of Egypt and Syria who captured (1187) Jerusalem and defended it during the Third Crusade (1189–1192).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun sultan of Syria and Egypt; reconquered Jerusalem from the Christians in 1187 but was defeated by Richard Coeur de Lion in 1191 (1137-1193)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In Damascus we were taken to the mosque where Saladin is buried, and there we learned that the crusaders who came from England were not the heroes of Christendom who we studied in school or saw in romantic movies, but bloodthirsty rapists and conquerors wielding the cross as a reason to slaughter Muslims and Jews.

    Saul Friedman: Let's Hear It For the Atheists

  • In Damascus we were taken to the mosque where Saladin is buried, and there we learned that the crusaders who came from England were not the heroes of Christendom who we studied in school or saw in romantic movies, but bloodthirsty rapists and conquerors wielding the cross as a reason to slaughter Muslims and Jews.

    Saul Friedman: Let's Hear It For the Atheists

  • In the time of Gregory VIII, a so-called Saladin tithe was instituted, which was payable by all who did not take part personally in the crusade to recover the Holy Land.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • Ibn Ibrahim, was professor in the college at Arbela founded by Kukuburi, or the Blue Wolf, the governor of that city and the region of which it was the capital, the brother-in-law of Salah Ad-Din, the sultan, whom we in England know as Saladin, the enemy of the Cross, and the son of Ali

    A Boswell of Baghdad With Diversions

  • He had only to ride off with his warriors, when Melville would walk forth, call Saladin to him, mount, and ride away.

    The Story of Red Feather A Tale of the American Frontier

  • "Mohammed," "Bucephalus," and "Saladin" -- in Brooklyn; mounted thus, and armed with swords and shields and wooden lances, and cased in paste board hauberks, morions, greaves, and gauntlets, and addressed as

    The Curious Republic of Gondour, and Other Whimsical Sketches

  • Sybilla of Anjou, Queen of Jerusalem, had married the handsome but feeble-minded Guy de Lusignan, who was no match for the Kurdish chieftain, Joseph Salah-ed-deen, usually called Saladin, who had risen to the supreme power in Egypt and Damascus.

    Cameos from English History, from Rollo to Edward II

  • It was agreed at the same time that a tax, called Saladin's tithe, and consisting of the tenth part of all possessions, whether landed or personal, should be enforced over

    Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions — Volume 2

  • It was agreed at the same time that a tax, called Saladin's tithe, and consisting of the tenth part of all possessions, whether landed or personal, should be enforced over Christendom, upon every one who was either unable or unwilling to assume the cross.

    Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

  • This compliment I disclaimed, feeling more ambitious of being called Saladin the Prudent.

    Murad the Unlucky and Other Tales

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