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Examples

  • Salamander, which is a Greek word of Eastern origin, was applied in the earliest times to a lizard considered to have the power of extinguishing fire.

    The Log of the Sun A Chronicle of Nature's Year

  • Both artworks are very phallic - Salamander is all about The Object (armored suit, weapon raised from hip) vs. The Quiet War which is about a whole environment (spaceship flying down the center of a slot, other ships, planet and atmosphere).

    Book Cover Smackdown! Salamander vs. The Quiet War

  • His next novel, the science fiction story Salamander, is due for release Fall 2009.

    MIND MELD: Does The Used Book Market Help or Hurt the Publishing Industry?

  • His previous rage (in Salamander) is controlled but he remains a powerful Space Marine, an Astartes volcano waiting to erupt onto the Alien, the Mutant, the Heretic!!!

    Book Cover Smackdown! 'Zoo City' vs. 'Plague Year' (Czech) vs. Firedrake

  • Management suggest the creation of a new, vertically organised trust under the name Salamander

    The War with the Newts

  • The only thing I know about these scans of pages from a German kids 'books about a Salamander is that they are really beautiful and that they remind me of the work of cartoonist Jim Woodring.

    Boing Boing: October 24, 2004 - October 30, 2004 Archives

  • (Lots of other great goodies at this site, like Orson Scott Card reading "The Porcelain Salamander" and all six tracks from a children's story album of Star Trek: The Motion Picture.

    SF Tidbits for 3/8/08

  • (Lots of other great goodies at this site, like Orson Scott Card reading "The Porcelain Salamander" and all six tracks from a children's story album of Star Trek: The Motion Picture.

    March 2008

  • Each of the twelve participants works with Alli to identify a “character,” such as Magician, Fool, or Salamander, which is not like a role in a traditional play, but more like an archetype which is used as a lens; a description of how that person habitually processes feelings.

    Current Movie Reviews, Independent Movies - Film Threat

  • The Salamander was a creature commonly referred to in the medieval manuscripts she had studied back in Chicago, as well as the more modern book by Dee.

    red dust

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  • "In Australia some reference to the subject of iced drinks is necessarily required, for they are in great request during the hot season. There is a considerable amount of diversity of opinion as to their good and bad effects, but it will be found that the experience of most medical men is that when used in moderation they greatly relieve thirst and are not injurious. This, indeed, is my own belief, and were it not for the abuse of iced drinks, the same opinion would be held almost universally. America is the country of countries in which the inordinate use of ice has gained for it a reputation which it has never deserved. Ice, says George Augustus Sala, is the alpha and omega of social life in the United States. At the hotels, first-class or otherwise, the beverage partaken of at dinner is mostly iced water. Every repast, in fact, begins and ends with a glass of iced water. When consumed in this way it is no wonder that it often disagrees, and that ice-water dyspepsia is a definite malady in America. And more than this, imagine carrying the employment of ice to such an extent that it culminates in that gastronomical curiosity, a BAKED ICE! The 'Alaska' is a BAKED ICE, of which the interior is an ice cream. This latter is surrounded by an exterior of whipped cream, made warm by means of a Salamander. The transition from the hot outside envelope to the frozen inside is painfully sudden, and not likely to be attended with beneficial effect. But the abuse of a good thing is no argument whatever against its use in a moderate and rational manner."

    - Phillip Muskett, 'The Art of Living in Australia', 1893.

    Thanks to frogapplause for the discovery.

    October 25, 2011