Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Many of us who are Anglicans will have a suspicion that our wait for a restoration will be longer than Thorndike's.

    Archive 2008-04-01

  • I did spend considerable time years ago reading Morton W. Bloomfield's "The Seven Deadly Sins," and of course I have Thorndike's "History of Science and Experimental Magic" and other delightful reference works to aid me in working with vain thoughts and efforts.

    Return to the Range

  • One of Thorndike's projects focused on the problem solving abilities of housecats.

    Animal Cognition

  • On his work, see Lynn Thorndike's A History of Magic and Experimental Science (New York, 1923 — 58), 2: 401 — 35, and G. Se Boyar, "Bartholomaeus Anglicus and his Encyclopedia," Journal of English and Germanic Philology 19 (1920): 168 — 89.

    A Tender Age: Cultural Anxieties over the Child in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries

  • It was easy for the psychologist in me to imagine him inside one of Thorndike's puzzle boxes, tripping levers and pushing pedals randomly and then intelligently to get the reward.

    iPod to TV connection

  • In his theory of learning he rejected Thorndike's law of effect be - cause the concept of “satisfaction” was mentalistic.

    BEHAVIORISM

  • Many have commented on the simi - larity between this concept and that of Thorndike's

    BEHAVIORISM

  • Thorndike's law of effect concerns acts, not movements.

    BEHAVIORISM

  • The pattern of actions which lead to a reduction of a need becomes reinforced — as in Thorndike's law of effect.

    BEHAVIORISM

  • Operant conditioning has been, in fact, an - other way of reformulating Thorndike's Law of Effect, in nonmentalistic terminology.

    BEHAVIORISM

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