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Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Borrowing from Sanskrit अभिनय ("acting, dramatic action")

Examples

  • Then followed several solos and duets with intricate footwork and some amazing elements of abhinaya (expressions).

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  • So we set up a repertoire on similar lines in Odissi: mangalacharan, battu, abhinaya, pallavi, etc., up to moksha.

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  • Guru Lakshman's choreography also contributed to the feeling of neatness with unhurried abhinaya and short jati korvais.

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  • It is to learn the 'navarasa' or the art of 'abhinaya' that many senior Sri Lankan artists studied dance in India.

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  • Shloka Vaidyalingam trained by the Reddys, gave a competent Kuchipudi presentation foot-sure in rhythm with fair abhinaya understanding, highlighted through the Ganapati invocation in Gaula, Tiruvottiyur Tyagiah varnam in Kedaram "Saami Nee Rammanave" with sringar interspersed with the rhythmic virtuosity of jatis led by Kaushalya's nattuvangam, and tarangam in Arabhi.

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  • Neat abhinaya and a slight uncertainty in footwork marked Radhica's recital.

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  • Radhica's abhinaya was precise and to the point and the Shanmugapriya intro by flautist B. Muthukumar was very pleasing.

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  • Staying with the theme of the sakhi, Radhica went on to perform abhinaya to the padam

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  • She has an impressive stage presence and a neat way of presenting her adavus and abhinaya.

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  • 'Contrasts and Parallels', presented by abhinaya expert Guru Kalanidhi

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  • From Wikipedia: Abhinaya is a concept in Indian dance and drama derived from Bharata's Natya Shastra. Although now, the word has come to mean 'the art of expression', etymologically it derives from Sanskrit abhi- 'towards' + nii- 'leading/guide', so literally it means a 'leading towards' (leading the audience towards a sentiment, a rasa).

    June 5, 2011