acoustic cloak love

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  • Pigeonholes in teh interwebs.

    June 19, 2008

  • of the hole in his underwears.

    June 19, 2008

  • totally unawares

    June 19, 2008

  • ... is coming down the stairs

    June 19, 2008

  • A llama in pyjamas.

    June 19, 2008

  • A mouse painting a house.

    June 19, 2008

  • In a dish.

    June 19, 2008

  • fish

    June 19, 2008

  • a rustic look

    June 19, 2008

  • A dirty sock.

    June 19, 2008

  • A beauty shock.

    June 18, 2008

  • a granite rock

    June 18, 2008

  • a gallant crake

    June 18, 2008

  • a garter snake

    June 17, 2008

  • a Garden State.

    June 17, 2008

  • A TastyKake.

    June 17, 2008

  • a cryptic lake.

    June 17, 2008

  • Or an organic blog.

    June 17, 2008

  • Or a satanic log.

    June 17, 2008

  • Or a sardonic pot.

    June 17, 2008

  • Or an agnostic frog.

    June 17, 2008

  • What about an atomic frot?

    June 17, 2008

  • I'd prefer an acrostic cloak.

    June 17, 2008

  • I was thinking more of the office-style acoustic cloak, or the children-in-restaurant acoustic cloak. I would imagine there would be several styles....

    June 17, 2008

  • Really? I can just imagine having your house cloaked and then not hearing important stuff, like gunshots and fire alarms.

    June 17, 2008

  • I want one. No, I want several.

    June 16, 2008

  • "Being woken in the dead of night by noisy neighbours blasting out music could soon be a thing of the past.

    Scientists have shown off the blueprint for an acoustic cloak, which could make objects impervious to sound waves.

    The technology, outlined in the New Journal of Physics, could be used to build sound-proof homes, advanced concert halls or stealth warships.

    Scientists have previously demonstrated devices that cloak objects from microwaves, making them 'invisible'.

    'The mathematics behind cloaking has been known for several years,' said Professor John Pendry of Imperial College London, UK, an expert in cloaking."

    - 'Experts unveil 'cloak of silence'', BBC website, 12 June 2008.

    June 13, 2008