Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Not inherent or essential; derived from something outside.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Added or derived from without; not intrinsic or essential; supplemental; additional. Also written ascititious.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Supplemental; additional; adventitious; ascititious.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective derived or acquired from something extrinsic; not part of the real, inherent, or essential nature of a thing

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective added or derived from something outside; not inherent
  • adjective supplemental; not part of the real or essential nature of a thing

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From Latin adscītus, past participle of adscīscere, to adopt : ad-, ad- + scīscere, to accept, inchoative of scīre, to know; see skei- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin adscitus, from past participle of adscisco ("admit").

Examples

  • Accordingly this motion, because it ceases not but when others cease is felt instantly, they deem perpetual and proper, all others adscititious.

    The New Organon

  • Unsatisfied, however, with natural beauty (like the people of all other countries) they strive by adscititious embellishments to heighten attraction, and often with as little success.

    The Settlement at Port Jackson

  • Cézanne was direct because he set himself a task which admitted of no adscititious flourishes -- the creation of form which should be entirely self-supporting and intrinsically significant,

    Since Cézanne

  • We rob them of their amusing but adscititious qualities; we make them utterly uninteresting to precisely 99.99 per cent. of our fellow-creatures; and ourselves we make unpopular.

    Since Cézanne

  • All notice, and some enjoy, this adscititious literary overtone.

    Since Cézanne

  • Also he was the first to recognize that an editor has some rights and prejudices, that certain words make him sick; that certain other words he reserves for his own use, -- "meticulous" once a year, "adscititious" once in a life time.

    In Flanders Fields and Other Poems

  • Also he was the first to recognize that an editor has some rights and prejudices, that certain words make him sick; that certain other words he reserves for his own use, -- "meticulous" once a year, "adscititious" once in a life time.

    In Flanders Fields and Other Poems

  • The Single Epicheirema is said to be of the First Order, if the adscititious proposition attach to the major premise; if to the minor, of the Second Order.

    Logic Deductive and Inductive

  • Now, the parenthesis, "as shown by the conformity, etc.," is an adscititious member of an Epicheirema, which may be stated, as a Prosyllogism, thus:

    Logic Deductive and Inductive

  • The Epicheirema is called Single or Double, says Hamilton, according as an "adscititious proposition" attaches to one or both of the premises.

    Logic Deductive and Inductive

Comments

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  • JM avidly advocates adscititious adoxography.

    March 25, 2010